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A rare british M1907 bayonet

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oxi81 View Drop Down
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    Posted: August 09 2010 at 5:48am
Hello
I am glad to share my latest find with you.
A M1907 hooked bayonet. Made in 1909 by Wilkinson.

This hookie shows a regimental marking on the pommel :

I.BRK
63

Was told that this marking means 1st battalion of Princess of Charlotte of Wales Royal Berkshire Regiment. Weapon #63.

But I don't really know.

Now, I need to find a MK1 scabbard (the same that common MK2, but with a leather tip instead of steel tip).




The most interesting marking is the crowned "ER". It means "Edward Rex". King Edward VII died in 1910 and all bayonets made in 1910 and after wear a crowned "GR" marking ("George Rex" for King George V who reigned till 1936).



Francois
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 09 2010 at 6:30am
Very nice piece of Cutlery
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LE Owner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 10 2010 at 4:27am
I'm watching a recent Sci Fi movie right now, titled Mutant Chronicles.
The main sci fi weaponry is unrealistic but there are many SMLE rifles used as well, and I spotted several Hooked Quillon bayonets in the early scenes.
 
Cast resin replica guns ans bayonets are common enough, but it could be that a few collectors items still reside in movie prop store rooms.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 10 2010 at 8:25am
now that is a fine looking hookie - where did you happen across that one ?

mine is a 1910 mole , had found a correct scabbard but the deal never came together so im using an early one with the almond shaped button , good luck on your search ,

has a canceled set of regimental markings - (cant read first two letters well) possibly RDF / 501  also lined out , 'Royal Dublin Fusiliers' ?

then a second set 15 / RIR / 53 .....  not sure what this is 'Royal Irish Rangers' possibly ?

she resides with my 1915 BSA mkIII , and also ahown with the japanese inspiration for the design




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LE Owner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2010 at 3:30am
Many years ago I repaired the badly broken stock of a WW2 battlefield pickup Arisaka that a veteran had left to his son. The rifle still had its bayonet and scabard with it. It was the hooked quillon type. I'd assumed the Japanese had copied theirs from the British.
Though when it comes to details of blades and fittings all premutations have already been tried at some point in history.
 
PS
Thought I'd seen the Hooked Quillon before on a much older rifle.
The Hooked Quillon was a feature of the 1874 LeGras Sword Bayonet.
 
Some US Civil War and British Sword Bayonets of the 1860s have a prominent quillon ,but these were not drawn to a hook, likely because cast brass handles were most common and brass wouldn't have been suitable for capturing a steel blade.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote No4Enfield Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2010 at 3:52am
Thats cool!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oxi81 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 13 2010 at 2:16am
Originally posted by A square 10 A square 10 wrote:

now that is a fine looking hookie - where did you happen across that one ?

mine is a 1910 mole , had found a correct scabbard but the deal never came together so im using an early one with the almond shaped button , good luck on your search ,

has a canceled set of regimental markings - (cant read first two letters well) possibly RDF / 501  also lined out , 'Royal Dublin Fusiliers' ?

then a second set 15 / RIR / 53 .....  not sure what this is 'Royal Irish Rangers' possibly ?

she resides with my 1915 BSA mkIII , and also ahown with the japanese inspiration for the design


Very fine 1910 quillon bayonet.
RDF : The Royal Dublin Fusiliers (Royal Madras Fusiliers)
RIR : The Royal Irish Rifles (2nd Battalion Royal Ulster Rifles)

Found on this excellent site : http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/brit_bayo.html#regimentals


Francois
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote finloq Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 19 2010 at 4:24am
Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment) BRK.
Under : British Regimental Markings from the afore mentioned sight: http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/brit_bayo.html#regimentals
"Self-realization. I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oxi81 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 22 2010 at 12:02am
An interesting picture :



Two hooked P1907 on the same picture...

Does somebody know what is hanging on the bayonet scabbard of this soldier??
Another scabbard? Maybe for the second bayonet ??

What is the frog made of ? Leather or web?

Francois
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tony Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 22 2010 at 12:40am
At a guess I would say it's the shaft of an entrenching tool.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 27 2010 at 7:35am
most definetly the handle for the entrenching tool the metal head section is in the bag hanging from the rear of the belt ,

the set i have is a later version that takes a no4 spike for mine probing but the rest of the bits are similar ,


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oxi81 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 27 2010 at 6:15pm
Originally posted by A square 10 A square 10 wrote:

most definetly the handle for the entrenching tool the metal head section is in the bag hanging from the rear of the belt ,

the set i have is a later version that takes a no4 spike for mine probing but the rest of the bits are similar ,


 
Thank you for this info, and for sharing this very nice british rack picture... ;)
 
Francois
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 28 2010 at 1:24pm
you are most welcome , i seldom get to share anymore , and i miss the days of discussing the accoutrements as well as the rifles/handguns 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RadioHack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 09 2010 at 12:46pm
Originally posted by oxi81 oxi81 wrote:

The most interesting marking is the crowned "ER". It means "Edward Rex". King Edward VII died in 1910 and all bayonets made in 1910 and after wear a crowned "GR" marking ("George Rex" for King George V who reigned till 1936).
Francois
 
 
It actually means "Regina" Latin for Reign, as in the Reign of Edward or in the case of our
current Sovreign "ER" Elizabeth Regina.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oxi81 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 09 2010 at 4:39pm
Originally posted by RadioHack RadioHack wrote:

Originally posted by oxi81 oxi81 wrote:

The most interesting marking is the crowned "ER". It means "Edward Rex". King Edward VII died in 1910 and all bayonets made in 1910 and after wear a crowned "GR" marking ("George Rex" for King George V who reigned till 1936).
Francois
 
 
It actually means "Regina" Latin for Reign, as in the Reign of Edward or in the case of our
current Sovreign "ER" Elizabeth Regina.
 
 


I thought like you about Regina and not Rex translation.
But on another forum, I was told by your compatriots that this marking means Rex as king Edward VII was a men...
Have a look here :
http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?101165-A-rare-british-P1907-bayonet.

Maybe we can get a confirmation from an english member.... Ermm

Francois
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RadioHack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 10 2010 at 1:06am

They are correct! My apologies, I have my Latin genders incorrect, I was always rubbish at Latin, just enough to get through mass as an alltar boy.

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