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Triggerguard effect on accuracy

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Muddly View Drop Down
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    Posted: June 19 2016 at 1:37pm
My No4MK2's triggerguard seems a little bowed on the sides when viewed from the magazine well. Also, if you push up on the guard bow there is some movement. I'm thinking of shimming the guard to see if it corrects some of the inconsistencies in group size and point if impact. If it works, I will glass be it for a permanent fix.
It's curious that this issue isn't mentioned in the bedding tuning instructions I've read. The king screw and bushing yes. But not the rear of the guard unit. The stock has no perceptable movement corresponding to the movement of the guard. But that doesn't mean it doesn't move under recoil enough to upset things.
My question to those of you more experienced with the Lee Enfields is does a tight fit of both the front and rear of the triggerguard to the stock have a positive, negative or no effect on accuracy and maintenance of point of impact? Thanks in advance for the help.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 20 2016 at 9:03am
Bent, or distorted trigger guards definitely have an effect. It should read "true" on a flat reference surface & the rear "ears" & front area round the King Screw bushing should be a solid contact at all points.
In a way you're lucky, having a mk2 with the "hung trigger" because with a Mk1 it would also effect trigger pull & let-off.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Canuck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 20 2016 at 10:31am
Agreed, Shamu and might I add that with age, the wood/trigger guard contact at the front king screw can become worn down and all the tightening on that screw won't help tighten up that contact because most likely the screw has already bottomed out in its boss. I had that issue recently so I took the bushing out, shortened it a bit and put in a new lock washer then tightened it up again and bingo, nice and solid again. These trigger guards are easy to manipulate as they are mild steel.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Muddly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 20 2016 at 1:39pm
Thanks all. I figured it would matter. Infield bedding is challenging and that's ok. If it were easy,everybody'd be doing it! Will post the results.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 21 2016 at 4:22am
Rather than shortening the spacer(if you don't have a spare) you can make metal shims the same shape as the front end of the trigger guard. Make sure the hole is big enough for the spacer to pass through.
Then you can adjust the amount of load on the wood when the main screw is tight. This has an effect on the pressure applied to the barrel by the fore end; that is why it effects the accuracy.

My No4mk1/2 has been regulated by Fultons, so it's not standard. So I can't tell you the standard up pressure for the no4. However I did use this technique on my No1MkIII* and my No8 to help get them accurate
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Muddly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 22 2016 at 5:41pm
The front of the guard us fine. It's the rear that was the problem. I cut a couple shims and it took .020 to tighten it up.I had to shim the portion of the inletting that straddles the trigger and magazine release. Now, when I push on the guard bow there's no movement. Hoping to test fire with my MkVII equivalent loads ( 180 gr Sierra @ 2440fps) tomorrow.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Muddly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 23 2016 at 10:58am
Results of testing after shimming the triggerguard. I think she had to settle a bit, but groups improved as firing continued. The worst was 3 1/4 and the best 1 11/16. Group overlap is perfect. Groups stacked nicely and vertical stringing gone. So far, it was a good idea to shim. Found the looseness by accident and correcting it solved the problems. If you shim your guards, don't shim guard to butt socket. Shim the guard to wood.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 23 2016 at 1:18pm
Yes the rear of the trigger guard pivoting about the rear cross bolt clamps the rear of the action's shoulder down into firm contact with the sloping surfaces inside the stock. This in turn pushes the stock & action horizontally kind of jamming everything together.
You may find once that settles down that the front end & the sides of the guard to wood fit needs a minor readjustment.
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