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#4 Enfield Bore Test

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Bhill671 View Drop Down
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    Posted: September 11 2009 at 1:58am
I purchased a #4 Mk1 at a gun show and only did a rudamentary visual examination of the bore before making the purchase.  After additional cleaning and scrubbing + .30 boresnake it looks pretty good but I was wondering if anyone had done this other test I read about:
 
Instead of using cerrosafe to check the bore wear, I read in a book about forcing a 00 buck shot (assuming it must be lead) through the barrel with a cleaning rod in order to obtain an measurable impression of the bore and rifling.  Has anyone tried this?
 
thanks
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Smokey View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Smokey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 11 2009 at 2:57am
It's called "slugging" the bore. Apply a film of oil or grease, then drive a soft lead slug through.
Problem is, it probably has five-groove rifling which makes the lead slug difficult to measure. Normal micrometer measurements won't work. More important though; if you aren't careful pushing the slug through the barrel you can easily do some damage to the bore. You need to insure that the cleaning rod pushes against the center of the slug, and does not scratch the barrel as you tap the slug along.
I wouldn't consider trying to take a bore measurement unless you intend to shoot cast bullets.
If the bore is smooth and shiny, with sharp rifling at both ends, I wouldn't bother. If it shows some wear at the breech end, it will probably shoot extremely well. Wear at the muzzle is what will hurt accuracy.
Shoot it with some good jacketed bullet ammo and see how it does on the target.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 11 2009 at 3:57am
A softer lead "slug" would be a fishing "shot" of slightly over bore diameter. Most buckshot is alloyed a bit to harden it, exactly the opposite of what you need.
LOTS of oil, before starting & after it starts & inserting from the muzzle end are good tips as well.
 
cerrosafe is mainly for checking chamber & leade dimensions, but slugguing the bore will give you more information about the whole length of the bore, but none about the chamber & leade.
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Bhill671 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bhill671 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 11 2009 at 6:25am
Thanks for the info, these are good ideas - In light of the fact that I have never attempted this before I will probably test shoot it first and see how it does.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Smokey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 11 2009 at 7:49am
Cleaning Rod Damage
It's caused by the rod rubbing against the bore, causing scratches and wear.
Grit does a lot of damage this way, aluminum rods are another culprit, particularly jointed ones.
Sapphire is a form of aluminum oxide. All aluminum surfaces will form this hard surface layer.
When the joints on an aluminum rod touch the inside of the bore, you're essentially scratching the steel with the much harder sapphire. When cleaning from the muzzle, even more care is needed since any damage here will have an immediate effect on accuracy. I always recommend ONE-PIECE stainless steel cleaning rods, and to CLEAN FROM THE BREECH.
I also store the rod in the plastic tube I bought it in, and make sure it's clean before I use it.
 
I'll get off my soap box (for now).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ed Hill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 11 2009 at 9:50am
Don't use the cleaning rod! Go to the lumber store and buy some wood dowel the right size, and cut the dowel into 10" to 12" pieces.By using short pieces they are stiffer and won't bow. Tap in, add another, tap in, repeat. No damage to the bore or the cleaning rod.
I also use the egg shaped fishing sinkers.

Ed
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bhill671 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 11 2009 at 10:11am
WOW! thanks for all of the insight - I figured out the wood dowel part while I was driving today, I though - get a wood dowel almost the same size as the bore and take the edges off, but I did not think of using short pieces to prevent deflection. 

Also all my cleaning rods are multi-section aluminum and I have never owned a stainless one - but I will be getting one now.  I cringe at the thought of damage or neglect I may have inflicted on my other guns over the last 20 years (ouch!).  I use bore snakes for basic post use cleaning anyway, but this is my first antique rifle.

thanks again for all the help
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 11 2009 at 9:45pm
Did he just say "antique"?Nuke
 
Just kidding.
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bhill671 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 11 2009 at 10:53pm
Oops!  the fact that it is older than the rest of my rifles is incidental I supposeConfused.  Considering I purchased it to use as a "precision rifle" I certainly did use the wrong word!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 12 2009 at 10:41pm
Just messing with you there. My #4 MkII is younger than I am.Wacko
 
Sluggging the bore is not a bad idea in reality if you're looking for accuracy BTW. Enfield bores & bulletrs for them come in a ptretty wide range of diameters, so to get the best from a bore it's a good idea to match them up & the best way to do this is to run a slug.
 
Nominally the bore is .311 inch, but they've been known to be anywhere between .310 & .314 & still be acceptable!
 
Luckily bullets are made in differeing diameters as well, all known as ".303" , or "7.7" but of differimg diameters. Once you know the actual bore diameter you just find bullets of that diameter & go on from there.
 
If you're planning on reloading here's a tip. Some Enfields luvv boat-tail bullets & some hate them. It seems to be an individual preference, varying rifle to rifle so this is the first thing to check out.
 
They'll also shoot 150 gr bullets with great accuracy as well.
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bhill671 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 14 2009 at 12:08am
Thanks a million for the info - I read a book on building a sniper rifle or precision rifle on a budget and one of the author's top picks was an Enfield #4.  The author also suggested exactly what you mention in your post about the bore size, possible variations, and the possibility of using a .312 bullet depending on the results of a bore test.   I will probably re-crown the muzzle or have it done also.
 
I have not even fired the rifle yet, just cleaned and scrubbed so far, and now after noticing all the character and determining the place and time of manufacture, I really don't want to modify it at all!Confused   I guess I'll just have to buy another one . . . so much for the "budget" project, I can see that my newer rifles will be collecting dust for a while!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 14 2009 at 2:49am
Do it!
(You know you want to)
 
 
Yes, I'm evile, mean, nasty & a curruptor of the true faith.CensoredWink
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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