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#4Mk1* Long Branch PH Sporter.

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W.R.Buchanan View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2015 at 4:19pm
Well an update to this project.
 
First the barrel didn't get cut and I learned a little more about the LE system.  it seems that sometimes the armorers just screwed the barrel in a little deeper to tighten the headspace. Apparently PH was not exempt form doing this also.
 
Mine was at .066 so Jess saw no reason why he couldn't not screw it in so far and get the front sight to line up properly.  So I still have a  22" bbl. which is fine. It has a #1 bolt head.
 
Also I should have it back by next Monday or Tues.
 
I have to build an oven soon to cure the Cerakote. That shouldn't be a big project but I still have to get out and do it.
 
Randy
It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,, It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2015 at 8:51pm
interesting , this has been enlightening in light of what we have always been told 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote klr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2015 at 10:44pm
Originally posted by W.R.Buchanan W.R.Buchanan wrote:

Well an update to this project.
 First the barrel didn't get cut and I learned a little more about the LE system.  it seems that sometimes the armorers just screwed the barrel in a little deeper to tighten the headspace....Mine was at .066 so Jess saw no reason why he couldn't not screw it in so far and get the front sight to line up properly. 
 


So, Jess removes the barrel to rebore and then when he re-installs it he just doesn't torque it down as much?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2015 at 8:28am
My barrel in it's correct position would probably still have the .066 headspace that it had before, maybe .067 at most. that is still on the tight side for these guns. as .064-.074 is acceptable.  3-5 degrees isn't going to make that much difference.
 
If anyone knows the thread pitch for those barrels we can figure out exactly how many degrees .001 would make.
 
Randy
It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,, It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do.
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W.R.Buchanan View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2015 at 8:29am
Originally posted by A square 10 A square 10 wrote:

interesting , this has been enlightening in light of what we have always been told 
 
What exactly have we been told?  I am interested I finding out all I can.
 
Randy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Canuck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2015 at 3:20pm
Randy, I believe the thread pitch on those barrels is 14-1 TPI.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2015 at 7:40pm
1.000/14=.071 per revolution.
.071/360= .0002 per degree. 
5 degrees would equal .001 in the headspace.
 
makes sense.
 
Randy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 07 2015 at 1:10pm
OK expecting this thing back early next week.  Need to find out some things as far as powder numbers for AUS and how they relate to American numbers.
 
Particularly 2206 which I believe is H4895 ,,, and 2208 which is I don't know what?
 
I saw some loading info on Jacko's thread about .303-35 using cast boolits but he only referenced these two powders.
 
Maybe some of our friends from the lower hemisphere can enlighten me.
 
Randy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 13 2015 at 8:22am
OK my barreled action returned from Jess yesterday with the front sight timed right and rifling that looked like it had been lapped.

Absolutely beautiful work!

As I mentioned before I got 4 groove rifling.

Jess was also kind enough to give me a .35-303 case to play with.

Got to find a Boolit Mould.

Proceeding to finish work now.

Randy
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 13 2015 at 8:28am
Detailing the metal work.

Lots of people might not understand what I mean when I say "detailing."

Fact: All machined parts have sharp edges on them after they are machined.

Sometimes they are dealt with at the factory but most times if they are not on the outside of the gun they are just left. Sometimes metal parts that run against each other wear themselves together. (Break in period.)

Last Friday I had a milling chip invade my nice Browning Citori Sporting Clays .410 and gall the he!! out of a couple of places inside. Almost broke my heart! This is a $2500 gun. Obviously not immune from this issue.

Still when you get inside you can see all the places where they just put it together and sent it out. Both of the extractors on this gun were so sharp they would cut you.

This Long Branch is much nicer than my BSA gun made in the same year. There are not nearly as many cutter marks and dwell marks in it as on the English gun. Both were war time production but the Canadian made one was made in a place where bombs were not being dropped on a daily basis. So less external stress equals better finishes.

I still had to file all the edges, and file out some machining marks so that they would not show up like sore thumbs after bead blasting and coating with Cerakote. I also used my Felt Deburring Wheel to blend edges after I filed them so every edge is smooth to the touch.

All of the internal parts are getting the same treatment and it took me nearly an hour to stone the two depressions on the bent where the trigger slammed into it probably from doing the Mad Minute or maybe just being fired a zillion times. I also have to address the striker/cocking piece, and a lot of work on the bolt handle itself. The end result here is a better trigger pull.

Every single part on this gun will get the full treatment and I will probably have 6-8 hours in this aspect of the build before I'm done.

This investment of time will pay off as a much smoother running and nicer handling gun in the end.

When you pick up a gun and it just feels good in your hands you know that you have done your homework. That's how I tell if I did enough work on it. Sometimes I even go back into it and do more if it doesn't pass the test. Sometimes you find a sharp edge that you missed and rather than live with it, you've got to go back and deal with it so it doesn't become a distraction later on.

This is why you put the gun completely together and fondle it for a few days before you put the final finish on it.

 One bit of caution. You really need to think about each and every edge you break as some of the parts actually need the sharp edges for correct function.

Randy

     

 
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Here's some pics of the detailed internal parts. All are ready for bluing which will be done with Birchwood Casey's Super Blue. They will all be treated with Frog Lube immediately there after. The only parts visible from the outside are the safety and the bottom half of the trigger.

The exterior of the barrel had been welded on to fill some small rust pits. There were some evidence of poor filing technique which had to be dealt with.

I literally used a Finish Sander with 120 grit WoD paper on it and sanded most of the goobers out using fast lengthwise strokes, and rotating by hand as I went. This took about 20 minutes checking frequently for progress.

Before anyone goes,,, Oh my God you've ruined that barrel and it has been "Welded On!" Shocked

I took maybe .001-.003 off parts of the exterior. The welding was only done on the surface and it wasn't that deep to begin with and poses absolutely no danger whatsoever.

Also it should be noted that the whole thing will get grit blasted before it is coated with Cerakote which will hide the vast majority of the things I didn't get out. Most are below the stock line anyway as they were rust pits caused by the metal contacting the wood over the years.

I still have to deal with the bolt itself and I think I am going to Cerakote the main part and the cocking piece. There is more than enough clearance for it to run smoothly in the bolt race after both are coated.

The guide ways on my CZ82 were all coated and after 100+ shots they still have no evidence of wear!

I think it will work out well.

Randy
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 13 2015 at 8:44am
It sounds like "breaking the edges" or "dehorning". Something we used to do to reduce snagging & binding.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 13 2015 at 10:15am
Some nice preparation going into that rifle Randy. It's great that you can get the time necessary to do the job properly.Looking forward to seeing the finished article.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hoadie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 13 2015 at 5:31pm
Please tell me about this Birchwood Casey's Super Blue
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote paddyofurniture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 14 2015 at 8:12am
https://www.birchwoodcasey.com/Refinishing/Metal-Finishing/Super-Blue%E2%84%A2-Liquid-Gun-Blue.aspx
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 14 2015 at 9:29am
Hoadie:  this product is a commercial cold blue solution that works really well for touching up places that got the bluing worn off.
 
It can even be used to completely reblue a gun however it is not really that good for that purpose as it doesn't have the same penetration as hot bluing does.  It wears off much easier. But still if you don't want to put that much money into an old gun it will do a presentable job and is a lot better looking than bare spots.
 
I will use it to touch up parts or darken weak bluing on a barrel or to finish parts I make for the gun.  See the Redfield Sight Mount I made for the #4Mk1.
 
I did all the parts on my #4 mk1 which were mostly in pretty good but partially faded condition. I darkened the bluing on the barrel as well on that gun and it also evened out the finish.
 
The parts for this gun as you can see in the above pics will need some touch up as I have removed the bluing on the edges when I deburred them.
 
The stuff is available at most gun shops and is about $10 for a bottle which will go a long ways.
 
Shamu:  "deburring" covers part of it.  Refining lines and removing tool marks is the rest of it. As you know there is plenty to do on an Enfield action.
 
Zed:  I will have probably 20-30 hours over the course of 3-4 months into this gun before it is done.  That is a relatively short period of time overall, and your ability to work thru a project in a systematic manner can keep it to a minimum, but it still takes time as in the end you still have to do things right.
 
Sometimes I have to do things over.
 
I go back and forth working on the wood for a while and then metal, and by doing this you get a really close look at all the parts,,, numerous times. Doing this allows you to develop a good picture in your mind of how you want the end result to turn out. This picture will evolve as you work thru the project and in the end you should be able to get closer to what you "actually want," as opposed to what you "thought you wanted."
 
Randy
 
 
It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,, It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do.
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