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Enfield No.7 22 Trainer

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jmiles1960 View Drop Down
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    Posted: January 11 2022 at 11:38am
I have a small collection of military .22 trainers and recently learned of this Enfield model. I was curious how difficult they are to find or even where to look. History of the rifle? Production count, etc.  I should probably invest in a Skennerton book.

Any info or advice is appreciated. I don't think I have status yet to post a "WTB", but I'll be looking around for one of these.

Thanks!


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Goosic View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goosic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2022 at 1:02pm
There's actual a No7, No8, and a No9 .22LR Enfield rifle. 
Not to mention a No1Mk111 converted to .22LR. 
All extremely difficult to acquire but not impossible. Prices can be as low as 1000.00, and as high as 2500.00 here in the US.
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britrifles View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2022 at 1:18pm
There are two No. 7 trainers, the No. 7 Mk 1 which was a conversion done by BSA from a No. 4 Mk 1 and also the C No. 7 Mk 1, a purpose built trainer that closely resembles the No. 4 rifle.  Neither were produced in very large numbers.  I’d have to look thru Skennertons book to see if he gave the production/conversion figures.  I doubt there are a lot of these rifles in the US. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2022 at 7:03pm
the Cno7 is fairly easy to come by if your willing to pay the price , they are not cheap , ive owned two over the years , this is a single shot 

the no7 on the other hand is fairly hard to come by , often when you do its missing the magazine which are nearly unobtainable , i think there are some repops but ive not heard good things of them , 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2022 at 12:45am
The .22 trainers are very collectable and great fun to shoot. Generally very accurate.
Below is a photo of one of my No8 mk1 .22LR and an SMLE .22LR trainer.
These are more common than the either of the No7 versions.

The British made No7Mk1 was an RAF contract 2500 rifles. 
I am unsure of the production figures for the Canadian made C-No7Mk1. Believed to be around 20,000.
The No8Mk1 production was around 17,000 as far as I know. Very popular and very accurate with the heavy barrel.
The No9mk1 production was around 3000 rifles
if you step into the earlier SMLE trainers; there are many variations and it can start a whole new branch of collecting. but most common model would be the No2MkIV*.

The No8Mk1 above, and below a 1918 SMLE .22LR, both are single shot.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2022 at 4:52am
Here is my 1946 C No. 7 with a 25 yard target. 

Long Branch used No. 4 Mk 1* action bodies, but marked C No. 7 Mk 1.  The unique bolt head incorporates an off set separate firing pin, the striker terminates at the stop collar which then pushes on the off set bolt head firing pin. The barrel has a No. 4 outer contour, but with a .22 bore (not a sleeved .303 barrel that was used in the No. 7 BSA .22 conversions).  A special rear sight is used which incorporates windage adjustment. 



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2022 at 6:10am
I wasn’t able to find a definitive number of C No. 7 rifles produced at Long Branch.  Skennerton stated the first contract was for 7,000 rifles followed by order in late 1944 for another 10,450 rifles.  Another batch of about 1000 rifles were built in 1951-52, presumably under a third contract.   So the total may be approx 18,450.  

I recall using the No. 7 trainer when I was in the Canadian Army Cadets in the early 1970’s.  We used those same rifles in the Canadian Army Reserves in the late 1970’s.  I think they were No. 4 rifles with the barrel sleeved for a .22 RF.  It was single shot.  I’m not sure what the official designation of that rifle was.  It’s possible that a group of surplus Canadian issue No. 4 rifles were converted to a .22 trainers using a BSA barrel sleeve (or one made by Long Branch perhaps).  Canadian Reserves and Cadet units all had the No. 7 .22 trainer at the time the Canadian Army and Reserves were equipped with the FN C1 service rifle.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goosic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2022 at 8:28am
I can neither locate or afford one of those rifles so, I settled for the alternative.  I bought a .22LR conversion kit for the No1Mk111 rifle and modified a No4 bolthead with an offset firing pin. Found and purchased a No4 magazine with the single shot loading platform and made a similar copy of the No9.
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