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351 power View Drop Down
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    Posted: September 27 2008 at 10:26pm
this is my favourite powder for .223 rem. i was wondering if anyone had a load for the .303 with 150g bullets
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 27 2008 at 11:02pm
First up welcome to our little Asylum.

  As for H322 Loads in the .303 . H322 is to faster burning powder for use in the .303 it's well suited for the .223 /222 etc The.303 excels with medium/Fast powders  H4895,IMR 4895 , IMR 3031,H335 even Varget works well .

      Dave   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 351 power Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 28 2008 at 3:03am
it's supposed to be slower than the 4198s, and 3031 so i thought someone may have tried it is all
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Smokey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 28 2008 at 8:01am
You could probably work up some reduced velocity loads using H322, but it is too fast for the cartridge. I looked through my reloading manuals and found some loads for the 30-30 Winchester using H322 with 100 and 110 gr bullets. No other .30 cal cartridges had a load listed for the powder.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 28 2008 at 10:17am
Originally posted by 351 power 351 power wrote:

it's supposed to be slower than the 4198s, and 3031 so i thought someone may have tried it is all


    Don't ever feel that you've made a mistake by asking a question. That's what this site is for !

     H322 falls into a place in Burning rates between the 4198s & 3031 . It's a little slower than the 4198's but a little faster than 3031! 3031 is a bloody strange Powder ! It has many uses as it will be a fast burning powder in  application in some cases ,medium in others & yet almost a slow burning in others!!!!!


     Dave
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 351 power Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 28 2008 at 10:53am
ok. cause i was thinking about trying some 3031. i've got some reloder 15 to try too. thanks
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ed Hill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 28 2008 at 12:09pm
Try them both, but I've had more consistent results on the target with R-15.
Ed
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mean17 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 28 2008 at 12:46pm
I load both .223 and .303 with IMR 4895 with good success. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Smokey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 30 2008 at 8:27am
Wasn't IMR3031 the first non-cordite smokeless propellant used for the .303 British?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 30 2008 at 9:37am
Originally posted by Smokey Smokey wrote:

Wasn't IMR3031 the first non-cordite smokeless propellant used for the .303 British?


   Yes it was in a round about way. With the advent of the P14 the British Gov also contracted the US to supply ammo & this was loaded with 'IMR16' this load was designated as Mk V11Z to show it was not a cordite load .It burnt with a lower pressure & was there fore cooler than Cordite ,whilst being that close Balisticly to Cordite the sights on rifles didn't have to be adjusted (big saving there !) After the war it was offered to the public as IMR 3031 & the rest folks is history


      Dave
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 351 power Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 30 2008 at 10:20am
tried a load of Reloder 15 tonite. 150g hornady bullets hit the same place as Hornady 150g factory loads. i'm pleased with that. about 2" high at 100yds. the strange thing is they are 4" high at 50yds. maybe cause my scope is high above the action? nice group >1"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 30 2008 at 11:28am
Originally posted by 351 power 351 power wrote:

tried a load of Reloder 15 tonite. 150g hornady bullets hit the same place as Hornady 150g factory loads. i'm pleased with that. about 2" high at 100yds. the strange thing is they are 4" high at 50yds. maybe cause my scope is high above the action? nice group >1"


 Nothing strange about it Mate. The .303 has a very high trajectory as opposed to say a .243 which is referred to as a Flat shooting round !

    It's all to do with verloisity ! The faster you push a Bullet the 'Flatter' it travels ,cartridges like the .303 travel slower & have a trajectory that rises to a peak & then falls off due to the effect of gravity ,the Old rule of thumb used to be you sighted your 303 in at 25yrds & then the bullet was at point of aim at 200yrds. What this means is that the bullet passed through the Bulls eye at 25yrds & would be high at 100 & then pass through the Bull again at 200 ! The height of the scope dosen't really affect the trajectory as it's already compensated for in the sighting in process. As a Matter of intrest try the 25yrd -200yrd test you may be supprized .

      Dave
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Coleman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 30 2008 at 9:18pm
Originally posted by Smokey Smokey wrote:

Wasn't IMR3031 the first non-cordite smokeless propellant used for the .303 British?


Several US ammunition companies loaded 303 ammo for the British from 1914 to 1918. These all used different smokeless powders other than Cordite. Remington used Dupont powders. Before IMR-3031, which was known as Dupont powder number 16, an earlier powder was used called Dupont powder number 15. Powder number 16 / IMR-3031 was developed in 1916. I don't know if the "numbers" relate to the year or more likely just the order in which they were developed. Number 16 / IMR-3031 was the first "approved" "Cordite substitute" powder but it was not the very first non-Cordite powder used in military 303 ammunition. IMR-3031 wasn't developed until 1916 so all earlier American made ammunition had to use different powders.

Besides the chamber pressure, bullet velocity and bore erosion requirements another requirement to approve IMR-3031 as a "Cordite substitute" was the powder charge weight had to be similar to the Cordite load.  The military cases were heavier with a bit less capacity than todays commercial cases.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 01 2008 at 6:32am
most excellent John ! I wonder ,in what year did DuPont adopt the Improved Military Rife (IMR) name for their lines of Powder ? It's something I always pondered over & have never been game to ask

   Dave 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Coleman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 01 2008 at 10:06am
I don't know all of the years but I've seen old load guides with "IMR" "Improved Military Rifle", "MR" Military Rifle", and "SR" "Sporting Rifle" powders. 

The US military standardized 30-06 powder to IMR-4895 in 1944 but that powder may have been produced before that year but that was the year all US 30-06 ammo went to using only IMR-4895. Dupont had a plant explosion in 1975. Some sources claim that the formula for IMR-4895 was lost in the explosion and Dupont tried to duplicate the powder knowing only the chemicals but not the formula. I don't know if the formula was only stored in one place. Sounds a bit odd but the current IMR-4895 has one original chemical completely left out of it and it seems a bit cleaner burning.

Here is some history of Dupont.

http://www2.dupont.com/Government/en_US/gsa_contracts/Government_Projects.html


1914
DuPont supplies 40 percent of the smokeless powder used by the Allies in World War I.


1917
All of DuPontís capacity is taken to supply the Allies.  The U.S. enters World War I without a single world-scale munitions plant for its own needs. DuPont undertakes the largest wartime engineering feat in U.S. history up to then and constructs a plant at Old Hickory, Tennessee, capable of producing 900,000 pounds of powder per day.  Between March 1918 and the Armistice in November, DuPont completed six of the nine 100,000 pound units.  It constructed a plant of 1,112 buildings and a city of 3,867 buildings to house the total 250,000 persons employed there during ten months.  Seven and a half miles of railroad track were laid in thirty days, and a 540 foot suspension bridge was built over the Cumberland River.
"

http://www2.dupont.com/Government/en_US/gsa_contracts/Government_Projects.html
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Coleman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 01 2008 at 10:13am
Originally posted by John Coleman John Coleman wrote:

I don't know all of the years but I've seen old load guides with "IMR" "Improved Military Rifle", "MR" Military Rifle", and "SR" "Sporting Rifle" powders. 

The US military standardized 30-06 powder to IMR-4895 in 1944 but that powder may have been produced before that year but that was the year all US 30-06 ammo went to using only IMR-4895. Dupont had a plant explosion in 1975. Some sources claim that the formula for IMR-4895 was lost in the explosion and Dupont tried to duplicate the powder knowing only the chemicals but not the formula. I don't know if the formula was only stored in one place. Sounds a bit odd but the current IMR-4895 has one original chemical completely left out of it and it seems a bit cleaner burning and it is slightly faster burning than older pre-1975 IMR-4895.

Here is some history of Dupont.

http://www2.dupont.com/Government/en_US/gsa_contracts/Government_Projects.html


1914
DuPont supplies 40 percent of the smokeless powder used by the Allies in World War I.


1917
All of DuPontís capacity is taken to supply the Allies.  The U.S. enters World War I without a single world-scale munitions plant for its own needs. DuPont undertakes the largest wartime engineering feat in U.S. history up to then and constructs a plant at Old Hickory, Tennessee, capable of producing 900,000 pounds of powder per day.  Between March 1918 and the Armistice in November, DuPont completed six of the nine 100,000 pound units.  It constructed a plant of 1,112 buildings and a city of 3,867 buildings to house the total 250,000 persons employed there during ten months.  Seven and a half miles of railroad track were laid in thirty days, and a 540 foot suspension bridge was built over the Cumberland River.
"

http://www2.dupont.com/Government/en_US/gsa_contracts/Government_Projects.html
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