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Zed View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 18 2020 at 9:47am
Interesting information. Thanks for posting.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 19 2020 at 8:07am
Goosic, I was reading the section in the Sierra Ed. V reloading manual on gas gun reloading and came across this description of reloading M852 match cases.  I don’t know it it apples to the lot you have, but you might want to look for a rolled-in cannelure just in front of the extractor groove.  


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 19 2020 at 10:55am
I have a handful of those.
I was given them by a match shooter using an M1a. He told me he would never re-load them.
I used them as test beds for setting up annealing times.

Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 19 2020 at 6:45pm
Looks like they may have had the black tar bullet sealant.  That stuff would practically weld the bullet to the case after 20 or more years of storage.  Shooters would break the seal before firing these cartridges by using a bullet seating die to push the bullet into the case just far enough to break the sealant.  It’s surprising how much force it takes to break this seal. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 20 2020 at 7:46am
Are you referring to my fired cases?
If so its just the residue of the "Tempilstick" heat sensitive crayon I use when setting up. It turns black when it hits the target temperature.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 20 2020 at 6:03pm
 Yes, the black residue inside the case mouth.  Is that Tempilstick? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 21 2020 at 11:14am
yes it is.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goosic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 25 2020 at 10:05am
Originally posted by britrifles britrifles wrote:

Goosic, I was reading the section in the Sierra Ed. V reloading manual on gas gun reloading and came across this description of reloading M852 match cases.  I don’t know it it apples to the lot you have, but you might want to look for a rolled-in cannelure just in front of the extractor groove.  


The problem was resolved with later refinements with the knurling process.




LEGALITY OF OPEN-NOSED MATCH BULLETS
The superior accuracy potential of commercial Match bullets had been recognized for several years. However, their exploitation in a quasi-military Match cartridge had been eschewed, owing to the fact that American manufactured Match bullets are fabricated by a soft swaged process resulting in an open nose. This type of bullet, if it was intended for use in combat, could be viewed as a violation of the Geneva Conventions, which proscribe so-called "dum-dum" bullets. This prohibition, contained in the 1899 Hague Declaration IV, "Concerning Expanding Bullets," bans those bullets "which expand or flatten easily in the human body." Although not a party to this declaration, the United States has acknowledged that it will abide by the terms of these agreements.

Regarding open-nosed ammunition, intended to be used only for marksmanship and competitive shooting, the Office of the Judge Advocate General has issued a preliminary opinion, stating that this type of ammunition does not need to be evaluated against the International Conventions. This opinion is based fundamentally on the stated use of the cartridges for non-combat purposes with special markings to avoid inadvertent introduction into a combat zone, and proper security in storage and transit. [NOTE- at the time of this articles publication in July 1981]

In the implementation of the special marking requirement, warnings have been applied to all exterior and interior packaging, and positive identification of individual rounds has been insured by the placement of a knurl on the cartridge case body. The identity knurl used on the 1980 National Match lot of ammunition was an interim design that proved difficult to apply and a few instances of case separation were experienced. The knurl on this design was only 0.025 in. wide and was located 0.500 in. from the head. An improved identity knurl was later developed that is located closer to the case head and widened to 0.060 in. This design is much easier to apply to the case, is much more visible than the initial design, and because it has been moved slightly rearward, where the case wall is stronger, NO FURTHER FUNCTIONAL PROBLEMS WERE NOTED. Figure 15 depicts both the initial and final design of the identity knurl.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 25 2020 at 10:59am
Thanks, that's worth knowing.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 25 2020 at 11:32am
The problem explained in the Sierra Manual refers to reloading these cases, not the original problem they had with head separations occurring on firing of the factory loaded ammunition.  The issue with reloading the cases continued until the knurling was discontinued, although apparently not predictable. 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goosic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 25 2020 at 12:08pm
Originally posted by britrifles britrifles wrote:

The problem explained in the Sierra Manual refers to reloading these cases, not the original problem they had with head separations occurring on firing of the factory loaded ammunition.  The issue with reloading the cases continued until the knurling was discontinued, although apparently not predictable. 



The excerpt was from the 7.62 Match Cartridge Accuracy Improvement Program by J.W. Hettel and went on to explain the the new knurling was moved lower on the case to .300" from the head as opposed to the original .500" from the urging of competitive shooters who were also reloading the cases after the fact.
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