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Lee Enfields in the Commonwealth

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Ragnaroni View Drop Down
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    Posted: September 07 2020 at 2:25am
 he!!o, so in my other question I brought up South African and New Zealander(?) Lee Enfields, I'm curious about the markings and how many were used. Like their markings and whatnot. Why didn't, for example, South Africa not produce guns, I mean they had the manpower and resources. 
Thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 07 2020 at 5:43pm
you need to remenber - depending on the time period you are asking of , that the equiipment to set up a manufacturing company capable of producing within wspecwas very expensive -- labor was cheap in those days -- the only reason india and pakistan had the facilities to produce was because the brits moved their outdated equipment there - then set up to produce the next gen items , in WWI neither the brits nor the US could produce sufficient quantity of their service rifles in a timely manner , thus we sar the first "contract rifles" produced by both established mfgrs - remington and winchester as well as the investement opportunity of eddystone that outproduced both the traditional plants , those served in both world wars , 

oh - they produced for both the brits and the US equally well , as well as making bayonets 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote terrylee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 08 2020 at 12:12am


South African WW II Production:  The "No.1 Converted", Pattern 1888 (SAR), Pat 1907 (SAR), Pat.1907 (AECO) and Pat.1913 (AECO). 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ragnaroni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 09 2020 at 9:36am
Interesting!!
What about rifle markings? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote terrylee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 10 2020 at 12:26am
Prior to being commandeered by the government, this particular rifle was a commercial Long Lee manufactured by BSA and is marked accordingly. Following conversion, it also received South African military markings.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ragnaroni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 20 2020 at 11:26pm
Sorry for the late reply, that's quite a history on a rifle. 

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