Enfield-Rifles.com Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Off Topic > Military Talk
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 234
Author
Message
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 25 2007 at 12:45pm
Name Confirmed Victories Country Notes
Manfred von Richthofen 80 Germany "The Red Baron", Pour le Mérite
René Fonck 75 France Top Allied ace, and all-time Allied Ace of Aces in all conflicts.
Edward Mannock 73 disputed UK Top scoring United Kingdom ace.-disputed
Billy Bishop 72 disputed Canada Top-scoring British Empire ace.-disputed
Raymond Collishaw 62 Canada Top Royal Naval Air Service ace.
Ernst Ude 62 Germany Second highest scoring German ace.
James McCudden 57 UK Victoria Cross, Croix de Guerre. One of the longest serving aces (from 1913 to 1918)
Georges Guynemer 53 France First French ace to attain 50 victories.
Roderic Dallas 51 (disputed) Australia Australian.
William Barker 50 Canada
Werner Voss 48 Germany One time friendly rival of Manfred von Richthofen
George Edward Henry McElroy 47 UK Highest-scoring Irish-born ace.
Robert Little 47 Australia (serving under Britain)
Albert Ball 44 UK Victoria Cross
Charles Nungesser 43 France Légion d'Honneur, Médaille Militaire
Lothar von Richthofen 40 Germany Pour le Mérite, brother of Manfred.
Oswald Boelcke 40 Germany Pour le Mérite Legendary German air hero, killed in 1916.
Theo Osterkamp 38 (32 in WWI, 6 in WWII) Germany
Julius Buckler 36 Germany Pour le Mérite
Francesco Baracca 34 Italy Top-scoring Italy ace.
Karl Allmenröder 30 Germany Pour le Mérite
Keith Park 30 New Zealand Leading New Zealand ace, flying with Australia. Croix de Guerre
A. H. "Harry" Cobby 30 Australia Once thought to be highest scoring ace.
Eddie Rickenbacker 26 United States -
Hermann Göring 22 Germany Pour le Mérite, later a main leader of Nazi Germany and commander of the Luftwaffe.
William C. Lambert 21.5 United States Second highest scoring American ace.
Aleksandr Kazakov 20 Imperial Russia Top-scoring Russia ace.
Frank Luke 18 United States Medal of Honor "Arizona Balloon Buster"
Raoul Lufbery 17 United States and France Leader of the Lafayette Escadrille
Max Immelmann 15 Germany Pour le Mérite
Field Kindley 12 United States, served under Britain
Indra Lal Roy 10 India India's only ace.
Donald Cunnell 9 UK Shot down Manfred von Richthofen
Lanoe Hawker 9 UK Victoria Cross. Britain's first ace.
Christopher Draper 9 UK "The Mad Major". Croix de Guerre
Roland Garros 5 France First nonstop flight across the Mediterranean Sea(1913). Attached metal deflectors to propellor in order to have a forward-firing gun.
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 25 2007 at 10:22pm
The Fokker D.VII was a late World War I fighter aircraftdesigned by Reinhold Platz at the Fokker company. When introduced into combat in 1918, it quickly proved to be superior to existing Allied fighters, leading to a second Fokker Scourge. So infamous was the airplane, that it was the only weapon specifically mentioned by name by the Allies in the armistice agreements at the end of the war
Back to Top
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 25 2007 at 10:30pm

Fokker's chief designer Reinhold Platz had been working on a series of experimental planes, the V-series, since 1916. These planes were characterized by the use of thick-sectioned, cantilever wings (based on his German government-required collaboration with Hugo Junkers, who originated the idea in 1915 with his own firm and with the earliest all-metal aircraft) instead of thin wings with external wire bracing. This resulted in a stronger wing with greater lift and more docile stalling behavior.

Late in 1917, Fokker built the V.11 experimental biplane, fitted with the standard Mercedes D.IIIa engine. In January 1918, a competition to select a new fighter was held at Adlershof. For the first time, frontline pilots would directly participate in the evaluation and selection of new fighters. Fokker sent in the V.11 along with several other prototypes. Manfred von Richthofen flew the V.11 and found it tricky, unpleasant, and directionally unstable in a dive. In response to these complaints, Fokker modified the V.11 by lengthening the fuselage and adding a fixed fin in front of the rudder. Upon flying the modified V.11, Richthofen praised it as the best aircraft of the Adlershof competition. It offered excellent performance from the outdated Mercedes engine, yet it was safe and easy to fly. Richthofen's recommendation virtually decided the competition, but he was not alone in recommending it. Fokker immediately received a provisional order for 400 V.11 aircraft.

Fokker's factory was not up to the task of supplying the entire air force, so their rivals at Albatros and AEG were directed to build the D.VII under license, though AEG did not ultimately produce any aircraft. Fokker did not use production plans for their designs, instead building directly from jigs, and so they simply sent a completed D.VII to Albatros to copy. Albatros paid Fokker a 5 percent royalty for every D.VII built under license. Albatros Flugzeugwerke and its subsidiary, Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW), built the D.VII at factories in Johannisthal and Schneidemühl, respectively. The former carried the designation Fokker D.VII (Alb), while those constructed at Schneidemühl were designated Fokker D.VII (OAW). Some parts were not interchangeable between aircraft produced at different factories, even between Albatros and OAW.

Albatros soon surpassed Fokker in the quantity and quality of aircraft produced. The state of German industry had already started to deteriorate at this point, and under 2,000 of the planes were delivered from all three plants, with the most commonly quoted figure being 1,700.

Back to Top
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2007 at 1:49pm

Back to Top
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2007 at 1:55pm
This is a photo of the cockpit of a Fokker DR-1
 
Back to Top
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2007 at 1:56pm
Back to Top
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2007 at 1:59pm
Back to Top
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2007 at 1:59pm
Back to Top
Lithgow View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: October 25 2005
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 1417
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lithgow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2007 at 2:29pm
I reckon those blokes had a lot of guts flying those planes. They dont look very substantial
Back to Top
Hatchetman View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: September 06 2006
Location: Fernie, BC, CA
Status: Offline
Points: 1284
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hatchetman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2007 at 3:40pm
Whats wrong with flying something made from canvas an balsa wood... with big machineguns on the front?

I have even flown something made of canvas and balsa wood WITHOUT its own engine before. Gliding was a huge laugh.

Woah that portrate of the red barron is awesome.
Back to Top
Cookie Monster View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar

Joined: January 22 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 7505
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cookie Monster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2007 at 4:05pm
Yes hatchetman it is an excellent work of art. Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen was a honorable pilot
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 234
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.