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40 years to get my Enfield

Printed From: Enfield-Rifles.com
Category: Enfields
Forum Name: Hunting with the .303 British cartridge.
Forum Description: Share your hunting stories with the rest of us.
URL: http://www.enfield-rifles.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=11360
Printed Date: September 27 2021 at 2:29pm
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Topic: 40 years to get my Enfield
Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Subject: 40 years to get my Enfield
Date Posted: April 08 2021 at 7:28pm
40 years ago in the mountains of NC I was hunting boar (in the wild, not in cages) and I had concluded that a No5 Mk1 carbine would be the perfect rifle (in dense woods and short range).   I found a nice one and was going to buy it when I got a job in the city.  Having no use for guns in an urban setting I passed on the rifle and put my guns in storage.  Now I am retiring and bought some forest property for my new home, far from civilization.  So last week I finally took delivery of a carbine:
  • a No5 Mk1, as planned long ago
  • matching serial numbers, except for the magazine, which is at least a UCF so the proper supplier and vintage
  • V 5536, made in April of 1946, so it was too late for the war and has seen little use (nice barrel)
  • slightly sporterized which reduced its value to nil, making it a spontaneous purchase
Background on Russian Boar in the Smokies...
A Colonel White got very rich during the first world war (how does a colonel do that?), and after the war he established his own private game reserve near the Smokies (on the other side of "the dragons tail"  from the smokies (for you bikers), closer to Robbinsville than any other town). It included Elk, various bear, and just about anything that could survive in the climate, imported from around the globe.
He lost his money during the depression and gave the reserve to his caretaker.
The caretaker was able to sell all the critters to zoos, except for the Russian Boar, so he invited his friends over for a pig hunt.  Their dogs chased the pigs into the fence, the fence failed, and the pigs escaped.  As I recall the death toll was one pig and six dogs, leaving the hunters without their planned dinner.  And now our wild pigs have a bit of Russian blood.  The only surviving element of the reserve is the concrete feeding troughs.  

My first game will be a wild turkey (I have lots of them).  A little small for a 303, but I never liked picking out the birdshot, or chewing it, so the 12 ga can stay home. 


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Dr. Hillbilly



Replies:
Posted By: Pukka Bundook
Date Posted: April 09 2021 at 6:34am
A very warm welcome to the forum, Dr Hilbilly.
Thank you for your nice and interesting introduction.   :-)
We would like to see photos, not only of your finally acquired No 5, but also some of the area you will be hunting.  It adds such a lot to see each others local scenery.
 
All the best from western Alberta,
 
Richard.


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 09 2021 at 8:41am
Thanks for the warm welcome!

After this post I discovered the thread for introductions.  So I will provide you with photos there.

Greg


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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: April 09 2021 at 8:51am
Welcome aboard.
Unlike some forums we consider sporters part of the Enfield family.
We do prefer they weren't chopped up new minty ones though.
Here's mine It had already been (well) refinished & the bayonet lug removed & the stock internally butchered before I got it.
(this is a Santa Fe "5 round" magazine but I also have the original 10 rounder.)



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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Honkytonk
Date Posted: April 09 2021 at 8:58am
Welcome from Brandon, Manitoba, Canada! Your move sounds like heaven. I wish I had the guts to do the same. I think turkey hunting with the No5 is a great choice! If you miss with the bullet, the muzzle blast will give the bird a heart attack! I've taken rabbits with mine... and squirrels. Not much left of the squirrel though.


Posted By: Zed
Date Posted: April 09 2021 at 9:54am
Welcome from Paris France. Sounds great getting a retreat for your retirement. 
If the .303 is too much you could try a .22 Enfield. 
Cheaper ammo, but a more expensive rifle though!

Look forward to your photos.


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It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 09 2021 at 12:28pm
OK, here are the photos
My place runs from the river up to the bluff which is out of view on the left, 220 ft. above the river.

My No5 above, and damage to the flash suppressor below.  Someone removed the sight protectors recklessly, abrading away much of the bluing in the process.  I will reblue this weekend, and look for a replacement long term.  

The sporterized stock below.

Serial No

As a machinist I love the lightening on the No5, but I must hate on Fazakerley just a little as they let their milling tool get dull!

I like to maintain my old cars, and now guns with period-correct machinery.  Most of my shop is in storage waiting for completion of the new shop, but these are three of my old machines still in IL.




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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: 303 Hunter
Date Posted: April 09 2021 at 4:20pm
Welcome from east central Alberta, Canada.
Good luck with the turkeys 👍🏻😁, look forward to seeing some pictures of your rifle and hopefully of your future table fare!

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The Lee Enfield is to the Canadian north what the Winchester repeater was to the American west.   Cal Bablitz


Posted By: britrifles
Date Posted: April 09 2021 at 5:10pm
Welcome from Atlanta, GA. You have done what I plan to do when I retire.  I’m moving up to the Blue Ridge mountains...never living in the city again.  


Posted By: Zed
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 3:14am
You have a lovely place there. Is there trout in the river? for a bit of fly fishing!
You can't beat old machinery! be it cars, guns or machine tools. That's a nice set of workshop hardware you've got there.
I have a small Relmac Lathe from the early 1920's; but it is currently in storage. I'm still working so haven't found the time to set it up in the workshop yet. But I'd like to get a milling machine and sand blast cabin as well. Oh and maybe a small forge! 


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It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 6:34am
Sadly no trout (I grew up with trout in the Smokies), but we have Sauger for fly fishing.  They are interesting as they are migratory like Salmon, they just do not go all the way to the sea.  

My approach to machines and cars is the same as for my No5 Carbine - forget mint at high prices, but accept flaws and buy lots of toys!

If this works as well in France as in the States you can buy old machines for scrap-metal pricing if you are willing to do a bit of restoration work.  My total collection includes 2 lathes, 2 mills, 1 drill-press, 1 shaper, and 3 grinders (it may have become an obsession!).  And I have 3 cars built prior to 1930 (again, not worth much, but fun)

Just pick them up and put them in storage until you have time for them.  Hopefully it will not take 40 years for you!




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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 10:53am
They removed your bayonet lug too.
Those are tougher to remove than you might think. 2 blind rivets & a tight friction fit.


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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Marco1010
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 12:18pm
Those flash hiders are right sods to remove !
I had one butchered very similarly, wow you wouldn't believe how much effort was needed to get the thing off, found repeated heating and quenching got it unglued from the barrel, but took some serious persuasion finally with a brass block and very heavy hammer.  I have no idea how they were installed but they sure never intended them to be changed out in the field.


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 12:29pm
Thanks for the warnings regarding removal of the flash hider.  
I do not need a bayonet, so perhaps I will settle on touch-up of the bluing.



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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: lyman1903
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 1:19pm
with a mill and a lathe,  that old flash hider will come of in no time, 


Welcome  from RVA


Posted By: Zed
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 1:22pm
I'd be interested to see the cars. Maybe post in the "Off Topic" part of the forum. 



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It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!


Posted By: Goosic
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 1:30pm
.....Hug.....


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 3:22pm
OK Goosic, to continue the theme of fairer and perhaps smarter gender...
As a machinist and amateur historian I have learned that "Rosie the Riveter" was not a riveter


In fact she was a machinist at the Alameda Navel Base.  Her father had been an engineer there, and when the call for help went out both she and her sister applied for jobs. In this image she is precision-shaping gears on a P&W No 2 shaper.

In this image she is regrinding the shaping tools.

As our Enfields are Brit. it should be pointed out that in England they started using women to support the war effort one war before we did.  in WWI they referred to the ladies working in the munitions factories as the "Canary Girls", as the chemicals in the munitions turned their skin yellow, eventually turning their hair yellow, and if they gave birth the babies were yellow.  



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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: A square 10
Date Posted: April 10 2021 at 9:32pm
welcome , im looking at that machinery and remembering what was in my fathers garage that i grew up with , there was a mill that had produced munitions in WWI , my father had run it in WWII early days before enlisting , nothing quite like old cast iron to make a young man feel part of previous generations , 

i never used it for ordinance - neither had my father once it was in our garage , but , it turned out a very fine plectrum banjo from aluminum in the late 60s-early 70s , i think my brother still has and plays it some , 


Posted By: Zed
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 3:06am
Great photos! 
When I was at school, (late 70's) we had proper metalwork class; with lathes, mill's and a forge.
Woodworking we had lathes and chisels etc. It put a lot of kids into a trade.
All that has gone now due to the "safety brigade" so all kid's get are screens. It's not good!
My colleagues in our workshop are in their 20's. None of them know how to sharpen a drill bit; or tap a thread. But they're all very good at looking at their cell phones!


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It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!


Posted By: britrifles
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 5:27am
The guy who rebuilt my Smiths speedo and tach on my ‘68 Velocette has a great machine shop full of old machines, a milling machine dating back to the 1800’s.  They are all powered by overhead belts and pulleys. He has to make his own parts for them.




Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 6:31am
I am in Hot-lanta from time to time, and would love to see that shop.  Does he tolerate visitors?

All of my old machines were originally driven by belt from the overhead line-shaft, but were converted to electric over the years.  In my new shop I would like to install a steam-engine driven line-shaft for them.  That is not my highest priority, but the machines will be laid out under the future-shaft so they need not be relocated when I get to it.

All of the original machine-tool builders are out of business, so as you observed we must make our own parts, usually without drawings. The job I am retiring from is the design of 3D printers.  My boss loves the old machines so he lets me scan and reverse-engineer the broken parts and then print the new ones on the million+ dollar machines in the factory (a nice fringe benefit!).  Actually I will still do some part-time prototyping for him in retirement so I will have future-machines next to the vintage ones from time to time.

I was ignorant of Velocette and had to Google it.  Way Cool!!!  Which model do you have?



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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: britrifles
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 2:37pm
1968 Venom Thruxton 500.  Named after the Thruxton field race circuit in England (originally a WW II airfield). 



Rather antiquated in today’s standards:  overhead valve, separate gearbox, magneto ignition, 6volt electrics, open Amal carb, drum brakes.  But, it still will do 100 mph.  




Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 2:45pm
Beautiful!
Who need more than 100 mph?


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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 3:24pm
I'm still drooling over the lady on the De Soto 6!

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Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: britrifles
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 3:35pm
Originally posted by Dr. Hillbilly Dr. Hillbilly wrote:

Beautiful!
Who need more than 100 mph?

Agreed, I realized that doing 100 mph is rather foolish at my age (60), but just wanted to know the old girl still has it in her.  Most of my driving is on mountain roads at 40 to 60 mph.  Occasionally I run her up to 70 to 80 mph on the straights.  It’s a good performer for only a 500 cc, small engine in today’s standards, but the 500 single was King back in the 50’s and 60s. This machine won a lot of races in its day. 



Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 3:36pm
Well I did have a Triumph Bonneville that did a little more than that. But who's counting with a classic? Plus it was a 650 bored to 750 Blown & injected with a bunch of other mods.Confused


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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: britrifles
Date Posted: April 11 2021 at 4:05pm
”Senior” class was limited to 500 cc back then.  Not many machines could beat the Velo, with a racing fairing, it could clock over 120 mph.  Not bad for a production road machine back then...


Posted By: Zed
Date Posted: April 12 2021 at 11:45am
That's a beautiful bike!
 I'm sure that 100mph on that feels a lot faster than 100mph on a modern sports bike!


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It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!


Posted By: A square 10
Date Posted: April 12 2021 at 8:35pm
100mph today feels a lot different on any bike than it did when i was in my 20s , im not doing it again in this lifetime but it was fun back then and glad i lived to remember it , just sayin , 


Posted By: Goosic
Date Posted: April 12 2021 at 10:16pm
I used to compete in the 125 and 250 class of dirt bikes. I know I never went 100 mph on those. My one and only streetbike was a V-Max. Scared the life out of me. Sold it the next day.


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: April 13 2021 at 7:34am
I had a Greaves "Scottish" 250 scrambler.
The worst thing I ever had to do was drive it from Brizzle to Penderyn. My butt was numb before I hit the M32 motorway!
ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!


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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: A square 10
Date Posted: April 13 2021 at 8:09pm
my triumph would do that to my hands on a long haul , i dont recall my butt getting out of sorts but that was a long time ago .......


Posted By: Sharpshooter82
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 8:03am
What a great forum,,,guns, bikes, tools, cars and girls!!!

I have never ridden any of the vintage bikes. My current bike is a 2013 Honda Phantom 750. To me unless you are doing a lot of highway cruising the 500-750 bikes are plenty.

I rode the dragon a few years ago and we stayed at a very nice bike friendly motel in Robbinsville. Beautiful area! I live in Jacksonville, Alabama on 11 acres but I grew up in the suburbs of Atlanta. Needles to say I will not live in a large city again.

I have a vacation planned for later this year and we are gonna spend it in the smilies, without the bikes I am sorry to say.

Eric


Posted By: britrifles
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 10:15am
I’ve rode The Dragon on the Velo several times over the last 10 years.  It’s a bit frustrating if your behind a car or a Harley.  Not that you can go that fast, it’s a very twisty road, ideal for a great handling bike like the Velocette.  I tell you, it draws a crowd at Deals Gap where the bikers hang out.  They just stare at it wondering what it is.

Most of my riding is two up, which in the mountains works the air cooled 500 single a bit much.  It was not really made for that, it’s in its element at 80 mph on the open roads that are twisty. 





Posted By: Goosic
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 10:28am
If you ever find yourself in Oregon between LeGrange and Pendleton on a bike, run Cabbage Patch.
If your in Colorado near Pagosa Springs, run Wolf Creek Pass, both ways. Snoqualmie Pass in Washington State is another fun section of highway. Sacramento east to Truckee up and over Donner Pass. I have never been fortunate enough to ride a bike up and over any of the roads I just described.  I had the unfortunate pleasure of running over those roads in a 1999 W900B Kenworth hauling heavy equipment and freight of all kinds...


Posted By: Zed
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 11:41am
Thats quite a big rig. Would not want to meet it coming the other way, if pressing on with a bike!

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It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!


Posted By: Goosic
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 11:50am
You would have loved the engine Zed. The Cummins N14 Celect Plus 575hp with 2100 ft lbs of torque. 
The Cat 988G on the trailer weighed 262,000 pounds.


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 12:11pm
I never had butt numb problems with my Bonnie, mind you only about 55% of the in unit motor/clutch/gearbox was Bog stock.Star
I know what you mean about the hands though. One of my mods (I'd completely forgotten) was a John Tickle (I think) or maybe Wal Phillips performance twist grip. It was so simple yet so clever, the drum that the throttle attached to in the grip was bigger in diameter so you didn't have to use 270° to go from "idle" to "FULL CHAT" It also stopped that "broken wrist angle" the factory original had.



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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Sharpshooter82
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 3:55pm
Originally posted by Goosic Goosic wrote:

If you ever find yourself in Oregon between LeGrange and Pendleton on a bike, run Cabbage Patch.
If your in Colorado near Pagosa Springs, run Wolf Creek Pass, both ways. Snoqualmie Pass in Washington State is another fun section of highway. Sacramento east to Truckee up and over Donner Pass. I have never been fortunate enough to ride a bike up and over any of the roads I just described.  I had the unfortunate pleasure of running over those roads in a 1999 W900B Kenworth hauling heavy equipment and freight of all kinds...

I have been down Cabbage Patch and over Donner Pass in a big truck. On the east side I have been across almost all of the "famous" hills. The same rules apply to big trucks for mountain driving and big hills,,,you can run them all day, but you will only do it once fast.


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Firearms are meant to be shot,,,not stored!!!


Posted By: A square 10
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 6:45pm
that has been our trademark - we do answer questions but we also go on tangents that are fun , some may not like it but we enjoy the "diversity" of conversation , you can always bring us back on topic if desired but sometimes its fun to go with the flow - as long as you5r original question got answered , we are an amiable bunch 


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 14 2021 at 9:36pm
As a new member I am delighted with the tangents, so I must beg forgiveness to return to my No5 for a moment.  I observe that the the rubber pad is significantly smaller than the traditional plate. When the rubber is rigid that increases the force per unit of area and must make the kick less comfortable rather than better.  So will a plate from a Mk4 or other previous rifle fit the No5 without furniture work?  

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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 15 2021 at 7:01am
Zed,
Back on page 1 of this thread you requested images of my old cars, so returning to the tangents, here are the first two of them

My son with the Roadster.  Quick-change rear-end, 3-speed top-loader, F7 clutch and pressure-plate, Alum. flywheel, Ross forged high-compression pistons, Isky full-race cam, Merc. long-stroke flathead, Stromberg 97 carbs.

The speedster.  A 29 Model A as typically raced by amateurs in the 30s.  The engine could only take so much HP without breaking so speed was achieved via light weighting them.  So this is finished, and not a work in progress.

I do have two works-in-progress, a 5-window coupe (blown Flathead) and a vintage-class lakester (blown flathead) for the Salt Flats, but those can wait for a dry-spell in tangents


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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: April 15 2021 at 7:16am
I'm afraid a No4 one will not fit. It has a totally different internal shape. You could put a complete no4 butt on though.


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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Honkytonk
Date Posted: April 15 2021 at 8:24am
My thoughts exactly, Shamu. It is a Sporter, so a regular No4 butt stock wouldn't be out of place. Would definitely help tame the No5 recoil. Would he need a longer bolt to attach the No4 stock? I suspect the No5 is shorter, or did they compensate by drilling out less wood on the No5 and the bolt is universal?


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: April 15 2021 at 12:24pm
I believe you will need the bolt, spring washer & other hardware for it to work.
OR
You could just but a sporter stock from someone like https://www.opticsplanet.com/boyds-hardwood-gunstocks-british-lee-enfield-4-mki-rifle-stock.html" rel="nofollow - https://www.opticsplanet.com/boyds-hardwood-gunstocks-british-lee-enfield-4-mki-rifle-stock.html



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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Zed
Date Posted: April 15 2021 at 12:38pm
Those are cool Hot rods. I've been a mechanic for over 40 years and love the old stuff; despite the fact that most of my day is with modern British cars.
A friend runs some pre war race cars and I help out during the Le Mans Classic event.



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It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 15 2021 at 1:35pm
Cool!  You are playing with cars worth at least 10X what mine are worth!  I was a volunteer team member on a Salt Flats team for years, but that team is now retired so I will need to build my own.

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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: April 15 2021 at 2:29pm
My father used to be a partner in a car back in the 50's (til I came along).

Had a old Ford coup..raced the dirt track circuit. Man! You can get alotta horses outta the ole flatheads!

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Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Pukka Bundook
Date Posted: April 20 2021 at 6:15am
Well, they say that Variety is the spice of life,......and here we have great variety in this thread!
 
Dr Hillbilly,
I put a no 4 buttstock on my No 5, and it felt much better when firing it. Larger surface area for the shoulder.
A page or two back, you mentioned the "Canary Girls".   
My grandmother worked in "The She!! Shop"   as a capstain operator, turning nose -cones for she!!s, in both World Wars.
Her sister worked in the same shop.  Both got severe lung problems later in life from exposure to the explosives.
Grandma loved the work though!
Grandfather on my dad's side had a nice Jag.   He only really used it very occasioanlly, as he had a Hillman shooting brake for every day farm work, and a 1959 Hillman Minx.
Besides a farmer, he owned Spencer-Beck (named after the farm) motors, in Middlesbrough.  (N. Riding of Yorkshire) and was a motor engineer.
He did beautiful spray jobs and coach-lining.
Also designed and built what became the standard "Rice" horse trailer.
 
 


Posted By: Pukka Bundook
Date Posted: April 20 2021 at 6:22am
The car in the above photo was not my grandfathers, but the same model, and looked identical.
When he passed away, my dad sold it to the local Vicar's son, for 25 Pounds!  I nearly went Mad!
No rust of course, as all aluminium body..
This was in 1970.
 
No white-wall tyres though.


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: April 20 2021 at 11:15am
Pukka,

I appreciate the contributions made by your grandmother and her sister to the war effort.  The sacrifices made by women have generally been inadequately appreciated. 

Before the invention of air-conditioning the wealthy built summer-homes in the cool mountains, among us hillbillies.   After the Great Depression my Grandad purchased grand luxury cars from the bankrupt estates.  As an impoverished mechanic and self-taught engineer he could make all of the spare parts he needed as the OEM was out of business.  So he spent the next 20 years driving cars far above his caste.  I wish we still had those cars!


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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: Pukka Bundook
Date Posted: April 21 2021 at 5:47am
 
Thank you sir, for your appreciation of the ladies who worked I munitions and other war work.
 
Grandfather used big old American cars on the farm as well, mounting a hay-sweep to one, instead of the two horses.
When he first built what became the Rice horse trailer, he loaded it with bags of sand, to the weight of two horses, and pulled by a Silver Dome Chrysler, booted it up the steepest hill in the area. 
(Ormesby bank) and was still doing 60 Mph. when he went over the top.
It had twin independent axles, and rode Very smoothly.
He also ran old Hudsons and Railtons. He liked big engines, and could make them sing.


Posted By: Olddust
Date Posted: May 01 2021 at 4:56am
nice No5, and some fine country you have to use it in. Welcome from the far end of Appalachian Mountains, Nova Scotia!!


Posted By: Sharpshooter82
Date Posted: May 01 2021 at 5:08pm
Originally posted by Olddust Olddust wrote:

nice No5, and some fine country you have to use it in. Welcome from the far end of Appalachian Mountains, Nova Scotia!!

I live at the other end of the Appalachian Mountains in Alabama. Where in Nova Scotia are you from? My fathers family is from Upper Musquidoubout, specifically Butcher hill. It has been a long time since I was there, I dont even know if any family still ownes the old farm. I would love to get back up there for a visit and check out Oak Island.

Eric



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Firearms are meant to be shot,,,not stored!!!


Posted By: Olddust
Date Posted: May 01 2021 at 7:59pm
Sharpshooter 82, I am from Yarmouth originally. Make my home in Kentville these days. I have visited Alabama coast in the past. Always loved the gulf coast. Fine folks. 


Posted By: Sharpshooter82
Date Posted: May 02 2021 at 5:53am
Olddust, I am in Jacksonville, Al. about 20 miles north of I-20 on the east side of the state. I like to cost the coast now and again, have done several reenactments at Ft Gaines on Dauphine Island just south of Mobile. However I am more of a Mountain person myself.

Do you happen to know any Butchers in your area?




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Firearms are meant to be shot,,,not stored!!!


Posted By: Olddust
Date Posted: May 02 2021 at 1:35pm
Sharpshooter, I do not know any Butchers last names. Surprisingly I haven’t spent much time in the Musqudobit area. I know there is some good Fishing and hunting there. Next time you come this way drop me a line, You can be my guest at our club for an afternoon of shooting.


Posted By: Sharpshooter82
Date Posted: May 03 2021 at 9:38am
Thank you sir, I will take you up on that some day.

Eric


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Firearms are meant to be shot,,,not stored!!!


Posted By: JD 303
Date Posted: July 03 2021 at 10:09pm
Welcome o the forum,Dr.Hillbilly.
As far as using the  Enfield,for Turkey,etc.
Try the "game Getter' adapter.
I have one,and it uses .22 blanks to power a .32 cal. projectile.
I've taken coyotes,at 40 yd,with it,and it's QUIETER,,and does good on turkeys,and squirrels,also!



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Expect the unexpected,..but don't expect the unexpected to be the way you expected.


Posted By: Dr. Hillbilly
Date Posted: July 04 2021 at 5:31am
JD, thanks for the information!  I had never seen that device.  Is it still available?  I could not find the "Hammond Game Getter" web site, and most of the internet posts on it are several years old.  If he is out of business I will add to my list of projects to tool up my old lathe to machine a whole set of adaptors, so the 10 round clip is full.   This might also be a good tool to ease the transition of youngsters and my wife from a .22 to a serious bolt-action...

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Dr. Hillbilly


Posted By: baltimoreed
Date Posted: July 04 2021 at 6:44am
Sounds like you live in a museum. Cool. Lovely property. 

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‘Give’em he!!, Pike’


Posted By: JD 303
Date Posted: July 04 2021 at 10:15am
Mr.Hammond is in Canada.
Here's a Link:

http://WWW.gamgetter.ca" rel="nofollow - WWW.gamgetter.ca

It will take you to his site.
The  kit  is made in different calibers,also.
 B.Hammond
Box 41061,Yellowbird,PO
Edmonton,Aberta ,
Canada, T6J 6m7

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Expect the unexpected,..but don't expect the unexpected to be the way you expected.


Posted By: paddyofurniture
Date Posted: July 04 2021 at 12:57pm
Try this

http://gamegetter.ca/home.html" rel="nofollow - http://gamegetter.ca/home.html


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Always looking for military manuals, Dodge M37 items,books on Berlin Germany, old atlases ( before 1946) , military maps of Scotland. English and Canadian gun parts.


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: July 05 2021 at 10:17am
There's also a chamber insert to convert it to .32 pistol cartridges.
https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/197660" rel="nofollow - https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/197660



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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: baltimoreed
Date Posted: July 05 2021 at 11:33am
I’ve got a couple of the .32 sub caliber inserts for my .30-06s. 

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‘Give’em he!!, Pike’


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: July 06 2021 at 10:12am
Probably the same guy, he advertises several different conversions.


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Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: JD 303
Date Posted: July 06 2021 at 11:43am
I don't think it's Mr. Hammond.
Another company name.



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Expect the unexpected,..but don't expect the unexpected to be the way you expected.



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