Print Page | Close Window

UK P-40 Battledress Jackets and Trousers

Printed From: Enfield-Rifles.com
Category: Off Topic
Forum Name: Re-enacting
Forum Description: For those of you that like to keep history alive!
URL: http://www.enfield-rifles.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=2884
Printed Date: October 21 2020 at 5:47pm
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 12.01 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: UK P-40 Battledress Jackets and Trousers
Posted By: Smokey
Subject: UK P-40 Battledress Jackets and Trousers
Date Posted: April 11 2009 at 7:40pm
I've been somewhat curious about how well this uniform actually worked out for comfort and utility.
Any reenactors (or original users) willing to share their experience?
I've been using Swedish wool uniforms from the 1950's and really like them for the colder winter weather. I got several for pennies on the dollar.



Replies:
Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: April 11 2009 at 10:35pm
Tony could impart more on this than I...but fromwhat I understand it was a vast improvement over the 1st war stuff.
Cdn battle dress did differ(very slightly) from Britian's.For the most part it was pretty durable.
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Tony
Date Posted: April 12 2009 at 3:48am
I'm not that old you cheeky sod. It was phased out in the 60s . Sure it was tough and durable but itchy as hell at times. However I did manage to score an old greatcoat and boy was it warm in winter.

-------------
Rottie (PitBulls dad.)


“If electricity comes from electrons, does morality come from morons

Born free taxed to death!!!



Posted By: Smokey
Date Posted: April 12 2009 at 7:55am
Tony,
Wool can be extremely itchy with nothing between it and you. Assuming you wore cootton or something underneath, how was it for comfort? Did it bind and pinch in odd places?


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: April 12 2009 at 10:35am
From the ones I've had on I wud hafta say no.(course they weren't xactly "tailored fits").But with the undershirt the Canucks were issued-it seemed to do OK.The old boys did tell me tho-that whenever they were in the vicinity of the Brits-they ALWAYS seemed to wanna have a parade & inspection.The ONLY way to clean they're battle dress was to use petrol..well that became a problem-especially with the tankers.(Brits & they're pomp-go figger).
Course-when ya got good & wet,ya tended to smell like my husky!
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Tony
Date Posted: April 12 2009 at 4:55pm
Tailored fit????  Yeah they looked like a 1 armed tinsmith had made em! I was lucky I didn't have to wear any of it. What I do know is when they got wet they weighed a ton. Try some and see! 

-------------
Rottie (PitBulls dad.)


“If electricity comes from electrons, does morality come from morons

Born free taxed to death!!!



Posted By: Smokey
Date Posted: April 14 2009 at 7:25am
Generally I wear my woolen stuff (usually Swedish) in the winter; with snow on the ground and temperatures well below freezing. When I was being one of the blue-suited people Hoadie kept missing, the wool uniform could be a real drag in hot, humid weather. I did notice that once I started sweating, it wasn't too bad.


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: April 14 2009 at 7:52am
KEPT MISSING??!! I DONT MISS PEOPLE IN UNION SUITS!! (Hoadie note: Confederate Army was "non-union" ) & furthermore-its the bullet proof underwear you-uns wear that aint fair!!Think of it this way...The south showed y'all ONCE..& if'n yas dont straighten out-they'll do it AGIN!! Now-play nice or the South'll wup yas again!!& THIS time I'll come down & give 'em a hand @ it!! (Blue-bellies in crusty underwear....sakes!
Hoadie(the Unrepentant)


-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: White Rhino
Date Posted: April 14 2009 at 8:58am
Hoadie , I live amidst a Civil War Battle field or 2......
We have one close by that is unmarked... cant find any thing on it. I havent really tried though and am not really into digging about it on the NET... Wouldnt mind taking a metal detector out in that area though....


-------------
"White Rhino"

"Everybody's got to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer." --W. C. Fields


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: April 14 2009 at 11:15am
..Just watch out fer bushwackin Yankees,Rhino!!I hear stories bout 'em hangin around-STILL! Tryin ta get revenge fer they're loss in the war agin Northern Agression!!
(very)Pvt.Hoadie 22 Va Inf Batt.C Coy CSA

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Smokey
Date Posted: April 17 2009 at 7:40am
Well I declare Hoadie,
It seems I hit a nerve!
 
"Methinks the man doth protest too much!" Wink


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: April 17 2009 at 12:42pm
Protest???HELL! NO! Just callin a spade a spade!!
(Crusty underware Yankees STILL thinkin they won Lincoln's war... )
Sakes! See what propaganda does??
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Smokey
Date Posted: April 17 2009 at 6:22pm
Well, all wise cracks aside, it was the better marksmanship of the South that led to the development of the NRA, to improve marksmanship in the general population.
 
I was looking at the reproduction uniforms at the "What Price Glory" website, and started wondering how well the issued uniforms worked out in service. The Swedish uniforms I use in the winter are excellent for the snow and cold.


Posted By: DRC
Date Posted: February 20 2012 at 3:29am
Hoadie wrote 'The ONLY way to clean they're battle dress was to use petrol..' - My father fought in the Western Desert and claimed that his baldness was due to not only washing his battledress in petrol but his hair as well!

-------------
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go. Always a little further: it may be beyond that last blue mountain barred with snow. Across that angry or that glimmering sea


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: February 20 2012 at 4:45am
"Tailored fit????  Yeah they looked like a 1 armed tinsmith had made em!
What I do know is when they got wet they weighed a ton. Try some and see!
"

True that!

I'm not sure which pattern we were issued. The RAF sometimes had it's own variations on things. There were #1 (Gaberdine dress uniform), #2 (wool battledress blues) & #3 (cotton? coveralls).

We had the short jacket with the "V" neck over a blue shirt. (attached collar for officers, separate collars for other ranks). It buttoned to the pants. All (except the shirt) was blue-grey wool.

It was actually pretty reasonable, assuming the unit tailor didn't take a prayer break while "tailoring" to fit, & forgot where he was before the call to the faithful. I remember being referred to as "deformed" because I took different size pants & jacket & they fit with the exception of moving the buttons to line up with the button holes in the jacket's waist.



Sorry it's not a better pic, this was the only one I could find with the correct jacket (blouse). The earlier (pat 37 maybe?) could be buttoned & then hooked closed at the neck, this type couldn't be.





-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Smokey
Date Posted: February 20 2012 at 8:05am
Buttoning the pants and jacket together, how well did that work out?


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: February 20 2012 at 3:34pm
I used to button my pants & jacket together by times.(Usually just for parade/inspection)Bit cumbersome if your in a hurry to answere nature's call!
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: February 20 2012 at 9:51pm
It worked pretty well for me at least. It was a bit like wearing coveralls, but without all the weight on the shoulders as the trousers were fitted to the waist & the buttons were mainly for keeping the jacket from riding up.
Wool was warm, a good thing if you're up in the Preseli Mountains in February, but for the warmer climates it would be a bit too much. Summer in the U.K. was "shirtsleeve order" where the shirt was used with the sleeves rolled up, & no jacket.

There was a separate "trop" uniform for the hotter climes with the infamous baggy shorts & knee length socks.


-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Aifwikir
Date Posted: March 04 2012 at 9:03am
  It prolly kept Shamu from loosing his pants while walking down town.  LOLLOLLOL  
Big smile
Aif


-------------
Retired US Army


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: March 04 2012 at 9:33pm
I miss my sofa!

-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Tony
Date Posted: March 05 2012 at 1:08am
Originally posted by Shamu Shamu wrote:

I miss my sofa!


 Oh no not another armchair warrior!!!Evil Smile


-------------
Rottie (PitBulls dad.)


“If electricity comes from electrons, does morality come from morons

Born free taxed to death!!!



Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: March 05 2012 at 1:40am
Armchair warrior, hell no.
(They couldn't get me UP into an armchair once I got settled in.)Evil Smile
Even if id did have a built-in rocket motor.
My old "office" in the pointy end of a PR-7.




-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 05 2012 at 5:40am
PR-7 !?? Wasn't that a CANBERRA? Are they still flying them? Aren't they like older than dirt??(I thought only CANADA used relics for the military)
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: March 05 2012 at 9:50pm
Yup PR-7 Canberra's.


We upgraded to PR9s later, but the MOD (air) kept dropping the ball with the replacement. The cockpit really is off center to the left, that was no accident.

This is a model, for some reason it's very hard to find a pic of a PR-9 with the glazed nose. The bomber versions went solid because they (finally) got the radar bomb-sight (Yellow Parrot?) working.



Remember TSR-2 that died horribly before it went into production, then the "MRCA" (Became the Panavia Tornado) which we all said stood for "Must Refurbish Canberras Again". TSR-2 would have had about the same performance envelope as an F-15 eagle, but in the 1960's!

When I first did a pre-flight walk round on the first PR-7 the date on the manufacturers plate was before I was born by 1 month! They were in service in various marks for 57 years.


-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 06 2012 at 6:05am
WOW! They been in service ALMOST as long as the Yank's B-52's!(Somewhere -I had/have a photo of a grandfather, father & son.They are standing in front of a B-52...that ALL THREE had piloted!!)
I've never seen a Canberra in anything but film & photos.
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: A square 10
Date Posted: March 06 2012 at 10:08am
something to be said for longevity ..........hope i outlive those buggers


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 06 2012 at 5:43pm
Canada still flies C-130's out of Trenton,. that are 1970's vintage
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: White Rhino
Date Posted: March 06 2012 at 9:49pm
I have been seeing some old vintage planes flying over my place ....  been quite a few lately , I am just not up to par with my air craft ID skills .....
I do know the Cessna is a pipeline plane ....says so on the wings !!!


-------------
"White Rhino"

"Everybody's got to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer." --W. C. Fields


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: March 06 2012 at 10:30pm
All sorts of good info & pics here:
http://www.bywat.co.uk/canframes.html" rel="nofollow - http://www.bywat.co.uk/canframes.html

One of the oddball things about Canberras was the engine start method.

They were designed for unprepared field operations, thus the big low-pressure tires & so on, so there was no need for a "trolley Acc" (External battery cart) to start. Instead there was a kind of 5-shot revolver using cordite (what else, it was, after all British) powered solid fuel rocket to spin up the turbines. This produce huge clouds of thick smoke smelling strongly of cordite *sniff, sniff*! Now this is no problem when you enter thru a small door & close it behind you, However....

If you re-design the nose for a more modern in-line cockpit & spool up before closing the canopy (Like Martin did with the U.S. B-57) then you better like the smell of cordite in the morning!Dead


-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 07 2012 at 9:58am
Methinks the Phantom of Viet Nam vintage had the same/similar starting.
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: March 07 2012 at 9:32pm
I don't know, but the USAF never stopped complaining about the thick smoke on start-up.
I've seen Brit F4's (Fleet Air Arm F4E IIRC)?start-up & don't remember smoke, maybe they had a dual system with either compressed air or cartridge?

Smart crew in this one, they closed the canopy first! I love the look on the guy next to the engine in that aircraft in the foreground. "Is it in fire or what?"



-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: LE Owner
Date Posted: March 17 2012 at 6:15am
Originally posted by hoadie hoadie wrote:

From the ones I've had on I wud hafta say no.(course they weren't xactly "tailored fits").But with the undershirt the Canucks were issued-it seemed to do OK.The old boys did tell me tho-that whenever they were in the vicinity of the Brits-they ALWAYS seemed to wanna have a parade & inspection.The ONLY way to clean they're battle dress was to use petrol..well that became a problem-especially with the tankers.(Brits & they're pomp-go figger).
Course-when ya got good & wet,ya tended to smell like my husky!
Hoadie
 
Gasoline was about the only way to get rid of body lice that infested uniforms, soap and water alone could not get rid of the eggs, which were lodged tightly in seams and hemns. A WW1 source mentioned ground crew being punished for purloning aviation fuel to clean their clothing.
 
During the U S Civil War soldiers would hold their clothing close to a campfire to kill the lice and their eggs with radiant heat. They paid especial attention to the seams where the lice hid and laid eggs.
 
PS
The U S Airforce also used the Canberra, I think under the designation B-57. These were license built by Martin aircraft co. A fine and versatile aircraft in its day.


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 17 2012 at 10:38pm
I thought the B-57 was named the HUSTLER.(I believe that would've been the world's 1st supersonic bomber)
Hoadie

P.S: During the un-civil war they referred to lice as "greybacks", among other things.

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: LE Owner
Date Posted: March 19 2012 at 2:35am
Originally posted by hoadie hoadie wrote:

I thought the B-57 was named the HUSTLER.(I believe that would've been the world's 1st supersonic bomber)
Hoadie

P.S: During the un-civil war they referred to lice as "greybacks", among other things.
 
The Hustler was the B-58.


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 19 2012 at 2:50am
ah!well there you go..memory gets less as years get more!
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Cookie Monster
Date Posted: March 19 2012 at 12:07pm
Convair B-58 Hustler, delta wing 4 engine bomber. Around Mach 2 was the  top speed. she was powered by 4 General Electric J79's sweet plane, seen one up close when I was at Wright-Paterson AFB doing so training.


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: March 20 2012 at 6:51am
Yup the 57 was the Canberra, the 58 was the Hustler & the 47 was the one we used to mess with in our 57's.Tongue
Think Jimmy Stewart in SAC, with the long greenhouse canopy.


-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 20 2012 at 4:30pm
Originally posted by Cookie Monster Cookie Monster wrote:



Convair B-58 Hustler, delta wing 4 engine bomber. Around Mach 2 was the  top speed. she was powered by 4 General Electric J79's sweet plane, seen one up close when I was at Wright-Paterson AFB doing so training.


Are you SURE about that, Cookie? I find that hard to believe.They weren't reaching Mach 2 in any tactical aircraft @ that time-far as I know(although the CF-105 arrow did better than Mach 2,it came a few years after).
I'd be interested to see just what her actual performance stats were.Like I said-I've never seen one in person-but always figered it was a cool kite.
I don't believe there is any left flying, is there?
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: March 20 2012 at 9:15pm
B58 was built for pure speed, so I don't think M2 is out of the question. There was a theory going the rounds at the time that if you were fast enough nothing could get at you so speed was a defense in & of itself.
Link here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convair_B-58_Hustler
Mach 2 indeed, that thing was all engines & fuel!


-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Smokey
Date Posted: March 21 2012 at 6:37am
There were discussions at one time of making them into interceptors for mainland defense.  High speed and a large weapons load were some of the reasons why. I don't know how manueverable they would have been. Cost to convert and operate them were probably why it never happened.


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 21 2012 at 1:26pm
Originally posted by Shamu Shamu wrote:

B58 was built for pure speed, so I don't think M2 is out of the question. There was a theory going the rounds at the time that if you were fast enough nothing could get at you so speed was a defense in & of itself.
Link here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convair_B-58_Hustler
Mach 2 indeed, that thing was all engines & fuel!




True enough about that.From what I've read, the "speed is armour" theory was adapted by the major navies looking to speed up their DREADNAUGHTS & BATTLESHIPS.These craft were mightily armed-but so weighed down with 15" - 20" or more of armour plating, that they were pathetically slow & fuel hungry.Hence..less armour more speed.
How that would have worked for the Hustler I can't imagine.
I DO know that the delta wing CF-105 was far faster than any tactical aircraft up to that time.(& she only had 2 engines).But she too was a big kite.
As I was informed - Uncle Sam designed the SPARROW missle system for the Arrow.(Wow-what a weapons system.Look where that led...sparrow-sea sparrow..aim1 thru 9 etc)

Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: LE Owner
Date Posted: March 29 2012 at 3:58pm
Check out the Hustler's contemporary, the XB70 Valkerie
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XB-70" rel="nofollow - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XB-70
Top speed Mach 3+
 
PS
Quote
I DO know that the delta wing CF-105 was far faster than any tactical aircraft up to that time.(& she only had 2 engines).But she too was a big kite.
The Arrow and the F-106 were neck and neck, but the F-102B which became the F-106 flew earlier.
The F-102B was a two seater version of the F-102 and while lengthening the airframe they incorporated the wasp waisted figure of the area rule principle into the modification.
The increase in top speed due to decreased drag suprized everyone. The area rule principle then became the way to go for supersonic aircraft.
 
A Movie about the Arrow wrongly attributes the area rule principle to the designer of the Arrow.
 
The arrow had many great characteristics, but due to placement of its weapons bay they couldn't use the sturdy fuselage mounted landing gear of other high wing designs, and the roller skate gear they used had ridulously long slim legs that collapsed at the least bump on the runway. This design flaw helped kill the production of the aircraft.


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 29 2012 at 5:56pm
Long legs, to be sure.But they never had a "failure" with them.(They had one that didn't rotate completley-which left alot of tire on the runway when landing).
What eventually killed her-was the COST.A V Roe Canada was the builder.They killed her on "BLACK FRIDAY" & everyone was immediatly put out of work.(except her top engineers-which went to work for NASA).
Ex wife's uncle worked on her.We used to have a display @ CFB Rockcliff in te museum.I worked the ARROW display when I was a Cadet.Didn't have much there:Nose/pedo tube, Clamshell canopy,joystick,nosewheel & tire.
Gov't put all of them through the gulliotine immediatly & destroyed the plans.
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: LE Owner
Date Posted: March 30 2012 at 6:15am
Originally posted by hoadie hoadie wrote:

Long legs, to be sure.But they never had a "failure" with them.(They had one that didn't rotate completley-which left alot of tire on the runway when landing).
 
 
Quote
 Disaster struck on its 11th flight, on 11 June, the left landing gear leg failed during landing, because it had not aligned itself properly with the axis of the aircraft. The landing gear broke off completely, and RL-201 skidded of the runway on its belly.
I've seen the series of still pictures of this accident, probably taken from a film clip. There was a lot more than rubber left on the tarmac.
 
PS
Just found there was a second accident due to the multiple small diameter wheels of the main gear locking up when the pilot used too much brake to correct for a sudden uplift of the rear of the aircraft caused by a droopy elevator.
That one left a lot of rubber on the tarmac.
 
To be clear I think the Arrow had great potential. If they had ditched the internal weapons bay and gone with fuselage mounted main gear as more successful high wing jets did the Arrow would have really gone places.
 
The fairly narrow track of body mounted gear has its own drawbacks, but those of the Corsair are extremely tough and suited to carrier landings.
 
A thicker wing would have allowed storage of more robust landing gear, but would have added drag and reduced high speed performance.


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: March 31 2012 at 3:41am
I wasn't aware of the 2nd accident.
I understood that the internal weapon storage was just to increase speed.
Eventually, it was the unbelievable cost over=runs that ultimatly killed her.
I read somewhere that the engines were sold to the Aussies.They apparently used some in a beefed up version of the Sabre.(But I dont know for SURE if thats the case)
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: LE Owner
Date Posted: March 31 2012 at 7:57am
Originally posted by hoadie hoadie wrote:

I read somewhere that the engines were sold to the Aussies.They apparently used some in a beefed up version of the Sabre.(But I dont know for SURE if thats the case)
Hoadie
Australia did use a stretched Sabre jet with more powerful engine, and it may be the engine the Arrow used, but I've seen the engine described as an airliner engine.


Posted By: Smokey
Date Posted: April 01 2012 at 5:56am
From:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAC_Sabre" rel="nofollow - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAC_Sabre
Powerplant: 1 × Rolls-Royce Avon turbojet, 7,500 lbf (33.4 kN)
Maximum speed: 700 mph (1,100 km/h) (605 knots)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_F-86_Sabre" rel="nofollow - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_F-86_Sabre
Powerplant: 1 × General Electric J47-GE-27 turbojet, 5,910 lbf (maximum thrust at 7.950 rpm for five min) (26.3 kN)
Maximum speed:
687 mph (1,106 km/h) at sea level at 14,212 lb (6,447 kg) combat weight (also reported 678 mph (1,091 km/h))
599 at 35,000 feet (11,000 m) at 15,352 pounds (6,960 kg). (597 knots (1,106 km/h) at 6446 m, 1,091 and 964 km/h at 6,960 m.)


Posted By: hoadie
Date Posted: April 01 2012 at 6:48am
Thats nice info,smokey.But I didn't see where they may have fit the ORENDA(or was it IROQUOIS?) engine into any of the Aussie frames.
In Canada-they flew alot of sabres..none with the Arrow's powerplant tho.
Hoadie

-------------
Loose wimmen tightened here


Posted By: LE Owner
Date Posted: April 01 2012 at 2:06pm
Originally posted by hoadie hoadie wrote:

Thats nice info,smokey.But I didn't see where they may have fit the ORENDA(or was it IROQUOIS?) engine into any of the Aussie frames.
In Canada-they flew alot of sabres..none with the Arrow's powerplant tho.
Hoadie
 
The Orenda Iraquois never finished its endurance testing.
Quote
CURTIS-WRIGHT, in 1957, had ALREADY signed a deal with Orenda, to produce the Iroquois under license. The American engine maker believed that 12,000 Iroquois engines could be sold over the life of the engine. The deal was worth billions of dollars! All that Curtis-Wright needed from Orenda was for the company to complete the 150 hour benchmark test, successfully.

The IROQUOIS had sailed, SAILED, through the 50 hour benchmark test.

But before completing the 150 hour benchmark test, the gloomy Luddite Prime Minister of Canada, John G. Diefenbaker, on February 20th, 1959, cancelled both the production of the Avro Arrow, and any further testing on the PS-13 Orenda Iroquois.
The only Avro Arrows that flew were fitted with the same Pratt&Whitney engine used by our F-106 and a number of other U S Fighters.
 
The Rolls Royce Avon was used in many military aircraft but also in the De Haviland Comet airliner.


Posted By: Shamu
Date Posted: April 01 2012 at 10:10pm
Yup, we had Avon 101's in the PR9

-------------
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)


Posted By: Moondog55
Date Posted: May 08 2012 at 7:02am
As someone who had to wear the uniform during my reserve time ( by which the BD uniform was Formal dress LOL ) it was a PITA, yes it stopped the jacket from riding up BUT. taking a dump wearing battle dress and braces was an exercise in agility, you would not want to have dysentery.
the serge soaked up water, shrank if it got wet and dried quickly ( hence the cleaning in petrol ) was heavy , very heavy when wet itchy and scratchy also stiff when soaked and took forever to dry out.
But, the pockets were very well designed and the manufacture was such as to minimise the shortcomings of the fabric, there were two inside map pockets, long to take a folded map and these added wind-proofing too the front.
If you were smart enough and lucky enough you got issued one the correct size ( correct size looks too big ) then you could layer long woollen underwear, a shirt and a jumper underneath.
Also the wind blew straight though the weave.
But, put a windproof layer over the top and it was OK.
At Puckapunyal during our basic training we all tended to wear our cotton overalls on top of the BD ( when allowed ) except when on the parade ground.
I do know that as the war progressed the "Spit and Polish" attitude seems to have softened a little and windproof suits became more readily available and sometimes even issued.



Print Page | Close Window

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01 - http://www.webwizforums.com
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd. - https://www.webwiz.net