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Stubborn Striker

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    Posted: July 31 2022 at 4:59pm
I have only had to do this once before and only recommend it in dire cases. I tore up 4 different firing pin tools trying to get this one in the other day. I ended up pulling the cocking piece back and over on the bolt body, then engaging vice grips on the rear of the striker body to complete its travel into  screwing it in with the vice grips from the rear. I ended up with a retracted pin at the fired position, and correct protrusion at fire.
   The firing pin body will be marred in the rear, and must be filed and stoned as smooth as you can get them to avoid any contact with the bolt as the striker moves back and forth during cocking and firing. Ouch
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 01 2022 at 4:41am
I’ve not experienced this problem before.  Do you know the cause?  We’re the threads damaged in the striker or cocking piece? 

At least you won’t have a problem of the cocking piece moving on the striker, which gives creep in the second stage pull. 
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Cleaned and inspected before assembling. I took it out and back in several times working it like a tap, but just jammed up. I think it must have been a MKIII pin that was sent instead of a pin for a #4 as I believe the threads are a bit different.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Doco Overboard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 01 2022 at 6:17pm
Sometimes the threads are tinned with solder if they're a loose fit.
They can be a bear if they're tightly fitted.
I think the threads get warmed on assembly maybe and that's how they go together initially.
Getting them separated is another matter it seems.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 01 2022 at 6:35pm
Are you sure its the correct thread?
No 1 & No 4 were different threads but otherwise interchangeably ( dimensionally)?
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 3:44am
I’m pretty sure the thread pattern on the No. 1 rifles is different from the No. 4 and not interchangeable. That’s likely the reason you had trouble. But, apparently the striker is dimensionally the same except for the threads as you got it to work.

I have used solder on the striker threads to remove slack between it and the cocking piece.  But solder is relatively soft, and never had trouble in reassembly.  Trick is to give the solder a quick wipe with a rag to remove excess while it’s still hot/liquid. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 11:45am
Yes, the strikers are not interchangeable.
You may find the cocking piece, or striker, thread is now burghered!
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Doco Overboard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 11:55am
The threads are different between the two.
You would have to cut and then section the two, and rejoin them if a replacement wasn't readily  available.
Somewhere recently I looked at an image of a No 1 with a No 4 cocking piece screwed onto it.
Might have been on GB I think.
Makes me cringe the more I think about it. Cry
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goosic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 12:37pm
Originally posted by Doco Overboard Doco Overboard wrote:

The threads are different between the two.
You would have to cut and then section the two, and rejoin them if a replacement wasn't readily  available.
Somewhere recently I looked at an image of a No 1 with a No 4 cocking piece screwed onto it.
Might have been on GB I think.
Makes me cringe the more I think about it. Cry
  What you recommend by sectioning to pieces would not work. You would have to have to be so precise in your measurements first and then shape both sectioned ends to a diamond point, create a jig that rotates so the weld is uniformed while it is rotating. You would need to weld from the center of the piece out making certain no flux or air pocket is left. You would then need to heat treat the whole striker but only after you have trued up the striker itself.
The threads on a No4 striker is 1/4"×24 tpi, same as the King Screw.  The threads on a No1 use the British 0BA Standard. If all you have is a No1 striker available, recut the threads to 1/4"× 24 tpi as well as cleaning up the cocking piece threads with a tap.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 1:46pm
sounds like a lot of precision work i could bever do with my home equipment , buy a new bolt and start fresh if that is the problem , if not buggered get the correct bits to refit , this is outside my realm of capability and why ive not made a comment yet - but a buggered thread would be a safety issue that could cause great bodily harm you and others would regret the rest of your lives , after seeing some lesser issues at the range id be hard put to even think of shooting something in that situation , 

my armorer friend would just flat out say its an unsafe gun and not acceptable at the range ever till recertified safe 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Honkytonk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 3:16pm
But a new complete bolt and fit it up to the rifle.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 4:11pm
At minimum, watch for any looseness that develops between the cocking piece and striker.  If this became excessively sloppy, it’s possible for the cocking piece to inadvertently slip off the sear and fire the rifle when cocked.  I think the best course of action is to get a new cocking piece and striker making sure it is for the No. 4.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goosic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 4:41pm
Numrich Gun Parts currently has the new reproduction strikers for the No4/5 rifles. At least they did a couple of weeks ago when I bought two of them...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Doco Overboard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 8:44pm
Originally posted by Goosic Goosic wrote:

Originally posted by Doco Overboard Doco Overboard wrote:

The threads are different between the two.
You would have to cut and then section the two, and rejoin them if a replacement wasn't readily  available.
Somewhere recently I looked at an image of a No 1 with a No 4 cocking piece screwed onto it.
Might have been on GB I think.
Makes me cringe the more I think about it. Cry
  What you recommend by sectioning to pieces would not work. You would have to have to be so precise in your measurements first and then shape both sectioned ends to a diamond point, create a jig that rotates so the weld is uniformed while it is rotating. You would need to weld from the center of the piece out making certain no flux or air pocket is left. You would then need to heat treat the whole striker but only after you have trued up the striker itself.
The threads on a No4 striker is 1/4"×24 tpi, same as the King Screw.  The threads on a No1 use the British 0BA Standard. If all you have is a No1 striker available, recut the threads to 1/4"× 24 tpi as well as cleaning up the cocking piece threads with a tap.


Sorry, but I completely disagree.
I didn't say easy, or even efficient for that matter.
Or, this is a kitchen table, armorers/do it yourself task.
But...... saying it wouldn't work, is probably even wronger.
Thanks very much for your input however. (taps dies etc)
That's very useful for Enfield rifle systems.





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goosic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2022 at 11:19pm
Originally posted by Doco Overboard Doco Overboard wrote:

Originally posted by Goosic Goosic wrote:

Originally posted by Doco Overboard Doco Overboard wrote:

The threads are different between the two.
You would have to cut and then section the two, and rejoin them if a replacement wasn't readily  available.
Somewhere recently I looked at an image of a No 1 with a No 4 cocking piece screwed onto it.
Might have been on GB I think.
Makes me cringe the more I think about it. Cry
  What you recommend by sectioning to pieces would not work. You would have to have to be so precise in your measurements first and then shape both sectioned ends to a diamond point, create a jig that rotates so the weld is uniformed while it is rotating. You would need to weld from the center of the piece out making certain no flux or air pocket is left. You would then need to heat treat the whole striker but only after you have trued up the striker itself.
The threads on a No4 striker is 1/4"×24 tpi, same as the King Screw.  The threads on a No1 use the British 0BA Standard. If all you have is a No1 striker available, recut the threads to 1/4"× 24 tpi as well as cleaning up the cocking piece threads with a tap.
Sorry, but I completely disagree.
I didn't say easy, or even efficient for that matter.
Or, this is a kitchen table, armorers/do it yourself task.
But...... saying it wouldn't work, is probably even wronger.
Thanks very much for your input however. (taps dies etc)
That's very useful for Enfield rifle systems.
Disagree as much as you see fit to but there is no way to do what you have suggested be done without having a massive safety issue involved let alone keeping the original dimensions intact.  Your do it yourself kitchen table Bubba Gunsmith might get it to work ONCE but at what cost? The (tension/potential energy) put on that striker by the spring when the cocking piece is engaged is anywhere from 16 to 20 (foot pounds) of pressure. The only thing keeping that 16 - 20 foot pounds of (tension/potential) energy caged within the bolt body is that striker. If the tabletop repair were to fail as it no doubt would, the direction of the (kenetic/released energy) would be aimed directly at your face and come from the cocking piece and whatever was left of the striker. Ouch Saying that it wouldn't work is an understatement.  It wouldn't work safely if it worked at all. A fools errand if an attempt at such a repair is ever considered and completed.  It makes me cringe the more I think about it...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Doco Overboard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 03 2022 at 5:54am
Originally posted by Goosic Goosic wrote:

Originally posted by Doco Overboard Doco Overboard wrote:

Originally posted by Goosic Goosic wrote:

Originally posted by Doco Overboard Doco Overboard wrote:

The threads are different between the two.
You would have to cut and then section the two, and rejoin them if a replacement wasn't readily  available.
Somewhere recently I looked at an image of a No 1 with a No 4 cocking piece screwed onto it.
Might have been on GB I think.
Makes me cringe the more I think about it. Cry
  What you recommend by sectioning to pieces would not work. You would have to have to be so precise in your measurements first and then shape both sectioned ends to a diamond point, create a jig that rotates so the weld is uniformed while it is rotating. You would need to weld from the center of the piece out making certain no flux or air pocket is left. You would then need to heat treat the whole striker but only after you have trued up the striker itself.
The threads on a No4 striker is 1/4"×24 tpi, same as the King Screw.  The threads on a No1 use the British 0BA Standard. If all you have is a No1 striker available, recut the threads to 1/4"× 24 tpi as well as cleaning up the cocking piece threads with a tap.
Sorry, but I completely disagree.
I didn't say easy, or even efficient for that matter.
Or, this is a kitchen table, armorers/do it yourself task.
But...... saying it wouldn't work, is probably even wronger.
Thanks very much for your input however. (taps dies etc)
That's very useful for Enfield rifle systems.
Disagree as much as you see fit to but there is no way to do what you have suggested be done without having a massive safety issue involved let alone keeping the original dimensions intact.  Your do it yourself kitchen table Bubba Gunsmith might get it to work ONCE but at what cost? The (tension/potential energy) put on that striker by the spring when the cocking piece is engaged is anywhere from 16 to 20 (foot pounds) of pressure. The only thing keeping that 16 - 20 foot pounds of (tension/potential) energy caged within the bolt body is that striker. If the tabletop repair were to fail as it no doubt would, the direction of the (kenetic/released energy) would be aimed directly at your face and come from the cocking piece and whatever was left of the striker. Ouch Saying that it wouldn't work is an understatement.  It wouldn't work safely if it worked at all. A fools errand if an attempt at such a repair is ever considered and completed.  It makes me cringe the more I think about it...

Look,
I think becuase your fixated on "theirs no way" and devolving into safety issues I can tell you already dont know how to do the job.
Soon as you went on about grinding into diamond points welding heat treating, holding critical dimensions etc. It was then I knew you really didn't know what your talking about.

Also if I  didn't know any better, and becuase one could tell your more interested evidently in having or looking for a disagreement, rather than simply asking how would you do it?
I think I can leave this matter, at least on my on behalf alone right now.

Have a great day and again, thanks for all of your valuable contributions and knowledge sharing to the forum.Thumbs Up


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