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yoeri View Drop Down
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    Posted: December 04 2009 at 7:33pm
what is the best way for reloading the .303 cartridge for the enfield?

single stage or more full auto?

how about the best type of powder for it? i heard about a belgian type that would be great, pcl.
any pro's and contra's about it?

where to look for when reloading the 303, to prevent mistakes.

any other sugestions in this would be apriciated as well.

kind regards

yoeri
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Shamu View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 04 2009 at 9:24pm
You're not going to believe this , but!
A Lee Loader!
Yep the cheapest, simplest tool (kit) there is.
 
I would buy an arbor press though as it makes reloading with the lee loader much more comfortable than a big rubber hammer, especially when re-priming.Wink
 
I'd also but at least one reloading manual, mostly for the step-by step instructions on reloading, and a copy of the .303 All-In-One -Loadbook, the best investment I ever made.
 
Powders IMR 3031 or 4895 are both excellent for the load as are the Hornady 150Gr spirepoint bullets.
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote yoeri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 12:47am
with arbor rpessyou mean this ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Famco-3R-Arbor-Press.jpg

already got an reloading manual in dutch, but the loadbook you are mentioning is new to me :)

i will do some googling for it.

the powder from belgium i mentioned  is not good for the enfield?
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yoeri View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote yoeri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 12:49am
google isn't finding anything about it.

can you possibly post a link to it?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 3:10am
The loadbook is just a list of every load for a single caliber.
It is usually compiled from the data of lots of reloading sources & so is a great resource for that odd combination of bullet & powder that you can't find listed anywhere.
Most of the information is just tables of load data so you could probably get in any language & find the information very usefull.
Midway sells them here in the US, maybe there also?
 
Arbor press is a type of press, not a brand, that may be causing some confusion?
Basically it is a frame with a piston, or ram, that the operator can raise & lower with some kind of lever system. Tool & supply catalogs are agood place to look for them.
 
You don't HAVE to have one, it's just a little easier with one & you could get it after the lee kit & just add it in later.
 
I'm not familiar with the powder so I can't comment on it in any way that is useful, but a lot of powders are sold in different countries under different names. If it's also sold in the US with a different name then maybe I could say something usefull.
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 3:13am
Sorry, forgot this bit.
Heres an good idea on the variety & pricing of presses. You'd only need one big enough to fit the dies into & tonnage isn't that vital as you're going to be using it for (relatively) lightweight work.
 
Here's a link to the loadbook.
 
Bear in mind this will list all US products & names, you will probably have to do some digging to find Belgian components matching the US versions.
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote yoeri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 5:19am
thanks a lot for the info :)

finding the belgian components is hopefuly not that dificult :)

i will let it know if i find it , it could be usefull for other persons to :)

i did had a lee press in mind , and even found some secondhand example on the net .

from the link to wikipedia i did gues that the arbor press is just a small type of press what can be used for multiple purposes.

i hope this is in a nuteshell the use of the arbor press?


kind regards



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote airforcediver Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 6:42am
Outside of what Shamu has mention, the Lee anniversary kit is also a good way to go.  I also believe that if you got the space one can't have enough presses Tongue
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 7:21am
"i hope this is in a nuteshell the use of the arbor press?"
Yes, squeezing things together with lots of pressure & repeatable control. (Preferably for under U.S. $ 200)Thumbs Up
 
I agree with airforcedriver BTW, I have 2 presses & a Lee loader, but you asked for starting setups!
The lee loader may not be the final setup you end up with, but it is a good learning/starting setup.Pig
Please don't ask for a picture of my reloading setup/bench, they are supposed to be tidy & cleanBig smile
 
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ed Hill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 9:16am
OK, for another thought, the Lee loader neck sizes only and doesn't full length re-size the shell. You wouldn't be able to use used or range brass.
If you are only going to reload rifle I'd look for a single stage press, any of the better manufacturers are good. The current best buy and readily available is the Lee cast classic single stage. 

Ed 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 05 2009 at 9:29pm
Thats true, what Ed says.
I was assuming you were reloading your own brass.
 
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hoadie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 06 2009 at 9:36am
You guys aint gonna believe this...but last night I was attempting to order 2 books from Cabella's on re-loading.The book by Mr.Lee-on re-loading the .303 Britsh is restricted-unable to ship to Canada.WTF??!! Its a BOOK for criminy's sake!!
This Police state/corrupt/nickle dime/communist state is gettin completly out of hand!!(Now I know the REAL reason they wanted to have ALL long weapons in Canada registered...cause when this new HST tax is implemented-someone out there is undoubtedly going to off a politician.& when that happens-they'll confiscate EVERYTHING!)Given that NOTHING happens until a politician is directly affected by it-you just watch & see..ther'll be a terrible wailing & gnashing of teeth!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Coleman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 06 2009 at 1:50pm
I have a friend in Antwerp that reloads, but he doesn't reload 303 British. Get the Lee deluxe die set I think it's called. The one that includes the neck sizing collet die and the full length sizing die. The collet die is most useful for 303 British but there may be times you can use the full length die. Lee dies are cheaper than others in the States. A single stage press should be fine and great for learning. My friend in Antwerp has a very expensive progressive Dillon press. A turret press is between a single stage press and a progressive. It can useful and fast. The Lee Classic Cast turret press is one of the best deals.

I studied in Antwerp and Ghent some years ago.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LE Owner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 08 2009 at 10:59pm
I also use a Lee Loader.
First one of these I had was a gift from a younger friend whom I'd given some of my older powders and loaned books to when he first started reloading. Later when I got my first .303 he give me his Lee loader after he'd bought a new press.
 
It wasn't long before he found he got better results with the Lee Loader and bought a newer model of it. He then traded his newer Lee loader to me for his old one, since it had some sentimental value as his first reloading tool.
 
My own first reloading tool was the Lyman 310 nutcracker, which I sold when I sold the Mauser I had first reloaded for.
Of the two types of tool I'd have to say the Lyman is the best, especially when seating primers.
Some Benchrest shooters would use the Nutcracker for seating primers though they used more sophisticated presses for all other steps in reloading.
 
There are many powders that are excellent for use in loading for the .303.
A New powder that shows alot of promise is the IMR SSC 4007 , which according to available data can produce a load ballistically identical to the MkVII load at a much lower pressure than any other powder.
 
Most sources attribute very low chamber pressures to Cordite, and in the earlier MkVI loads using Mk1 Cordite this was true, but the MkVII and other loads using Cordite MDT give pressures little if any lower than many more conventional propellants.
 
Use of salvaged or bulk cordite for reloading has been tried, but without the over the charge card erosion is six times greater than it is with it. British sporting rifles using cartridges without this sort of glazedboard wad had a very short accuracy life. An extreme example was the experimental magnum performance level long range match .303 cartridge using a boat tail bullet ,which precludes use of the card, was found to burn out its bore sufficiently to destroy accuracy within 400 rounds if Cordite was used.
WW2 era .303 ammunition manufactured by AXIS or Eastern European sources has been found with cordite charges and no cardwad. The cordite used may be Mk1 leftover from WW1 and sold as surplus.
Some WW1 manufactured Cordite turned out to be defective and began to deteriorate within ten years. Huge quantities of defective British ammo was sold off as scrap after each world war, and unscrupulous buyers sometimes repacked these.
 
Due to having found quite a bit of bad milsurp .303 I'm leery of using any of it, I use only my own handloads assembled with fresh Remington manufacture cases bought in bulk. 
 
If recently manufactured Indian Ordnance Factory MkVIIz ammunition was available I'd like to give that a try. According to the IOF site they will not sell .303 ammo to the civilian market.
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