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Aftermarket triggers?

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Aifwikir View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Aifwikir Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 11 2010 at 5:36am
I may polish the surfaces a smidge (technical term) and see how it works out.
 
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Aif
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Shamu View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 11 2010 at 7:10am
That usually helps. Oh & a dab of real slick grease.Big smile
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cliff H Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 11 2010 at 12:54pm
I allways thought it was a bad idea to grease up triggers. Ive always just smeared a very little amount, using a q-tip, of light oil on all the contact points.   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 11 2010 at 10:51pm
I go with the "If it spins, oil it, if it slides grease it" theory myself.
A LIGHT coat of an APPROPRIATE grease as well. Make sure it has the ability to remain unfrozen in cold temperatures, for example. Like you I use a Q-Tip & one greasy one does the whole mechanism both on the FCG & the bolt.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 06 2014 at 6:16am
You're correct. Timmey & those "cock on open conversions" are for Mauser type actions of the p-13 / P-14 / M1917.

The only replacement triggers I know of for the Lee-Enfields are the Ball bearing replacement trigger only from Huber Concepts:
http://huberconcepts.com/product/lee-enfield-trigger/

or the complete replacement fire train from CanWest.
http://www.lee-enfieldrifles.com/guns.html
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 07 2014 at 1:16pm
I actually went and bought a trigger pull gauge. 
The results were somewhat interesting as the #4 Mk1 BSA gun had a 5 lb 7 oz trigger pull after installing the correct Cocking Piece. This trigger has a very small amount of creep about .030 before let off due to the way the angles are set up on these triggers. 
IE; the Cocking Piece moves to the rear just before firing, because as the bent moves thru it's arc the strait face of the sear has to be at an angle to that arc and is never really tangent to that arc but intersects the arc instead. This was done for safety.
 
If it was tangent it wouldn't stay engaged and would just fire as soon as you passed the first stage.    Altering the angle only moves it closer to being tangent and as long as you don't go to or past tangent it will work as designed.
However after the correct part was installed this movement became negligible.  This trigger is now very usable.
 
The #4 Mk1* Long Branch has a pull of 5lb 12 oz. but has less creep and it appears that the amount of engagement is less on this gun.  IE the Bent is not as far up the sear as it is on the other gun.
 
Also the MK1 had a substantial groove in the sear face of the original cocking piece, no doubt from the Mad Minute drill. The replacement part was new, but I still buffed it to a mirror finish anyway.  I used silicone grease on these parts as they do slide against each other.
 
After reading Shamu's instructions on modding the trigger I can see how the engagement can be altered slightly.  I might do this someday when I am bored.
 
Another way I prefer to look at this subject is,,, if the let off is crisp and the creep is minimal you can learn the trigger.  Every gun is different, and that is to be expected. Every gun I own and shoot frequently must be approached from a "what does it take to get a proper surprise break with this gun," mentality, everytime I shoot it.  This usually takes 1-2 shots to refresh my memory as to what works with the gun I'm holding.
 
I think a 5-6 lb. trigger on one of these guns being used in the field as a hunting rifle is entirely appropriate, as long as it is a clean let off. On a gun that might get dropped or be used as a walking stick ultimately safety is more important that a light perfect trigger break.  As long as the trigger is a reliable one, down in the 3-4 lb. range would be as low as I would go for a field gun.
 
I have a friend who is a big time bench rest shooter. he let me dry fire his gun and the trigger is about 2-3 oz and I literally had to touch it 10 times before I could get a let off when I wanted it. However that gun is only fired at a bench at targets so the trigger is appropriate for it.  As a hunting rifle, even a Varmint Rifle, you would negligent discharge every shot for sure.
 
Sometimes you gotta run what you brung.
 
Trigger work in my opinion is a place where you have to know when to quit. It is not a case where more is necessarily better and safety should be your main concern.
 
I installed a Dayton Traistor Trigger in my Swedish Mauser.  I ahd to fool with it a lot to get it to where it didn't fire when the safety was released.  If you pulled the trigger when the safety was on it would not reset as the safety was not lifting the striker far enough off the sear to allow it to reset.  I finally got it to work right and congratulated myself and put it aside.
 
Well,,, a few days ago I picked up and decided to try and see how fast I could run the bolt.
 
It fired everytime I closed the bolt!
 
It will be replaced with a Timney.
 
Randy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 07 2014 at 1:59pm
Something so simple its frequently overlooked is a small dab of grease, (not oil) on the cocking piece's front edge where the sear rides. You'd be amazed how much of a difference it can make.
Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W.R.Buchanan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 07 2014 at 4:57pm
I AGREE, and the thing about the simple Enfield design is that it will fire in virtually any environment from tropical to artic, wet or caked with mud, and whereas the grease might freeze, the trigger would only get a little stiffer and not seize up completely.
Newer style triggers that are encased in a box have to be pretty clean and dry or they will stop functioning. For guns that are going to be worked really hard like a subsistence gun for a Ranger or some such application, and be subjected to use and abuse with little maintenance ,,, the simpler the better.
The beauty of the WWI Bolt Action Rifle is definitely in the simplicity of the designs.  The Mauser, Nagant, Enfield, Springfield, and 1917's  all had this simplicity built in.
 
Randy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DrkVsns Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 19 2015 at 6:17am
not sure if anyone has asked but could you post the how to pics on the trigger job
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DairyFarmer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 21 2015 at 7:42am
We have a company here (Thor Engineering) in South Africa that makes adjustable triggers of No1's and No4's. They don't sell directly, only through retailers. Last I looked they were about US$55 - US$85
http://www.enfield-rifles.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=4948
They also make good quality scope rings.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 21 2015 at 8:18am
That looks similar to the CanWest sold here, a replacement box assembly. I assume they won't fit the Mk2's with the hung trigger as the bracket is in the way?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Canuck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 21 2015 at 4:16pm
I'd have to say you are correct about that, Shamu. (Nor do the ATI polymer stocks, they won't fit the Mk2's without cutting).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dsklcsw Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 18 2018 at 11:03am
I just did my No.4's trigger.  Polished all the surfaces and did a slight downward angle on the cocking piece.  It's down to 2.5 lbs according to my trigger scale.  The first stage is just kind of a really light drag, but now the let off is crisp and light, almost too light.  It doesn't drop the hammer when I drop it on the butt from about 6-7 inches with or without the safety on so I think I'm safe.  Anything else I should check to make sure it's safe?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 18 2018 at 11:48am
There is one important safety item to check on your modified trigger.
On the standard cocking piece; when pulling the trigger to 1st stage, you will see it move rearwards very slightly. If you then release the trigger; like when you decide not to shoot. The cocking piece should return to the forward position, raising the sear up the face.
This is critical; because if it does not, the sear could easily slip off the edge of the cocking piece if the rifle is bumped. Dishcharging the round.
2.5lbs sounds a bit too light for me; that is below our Service rifle rules on this side of the pond.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pukka Bundook Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 18 2018 at 12:37pm
Dsk,
 
Engage and disengage safety with it cocked.  It should stay cocked. Then drop butt to the floor and see what happens.
a 3-4lb pull if all is smooth is no problem, but yours may be OK. just test it fairly severely To Be Sure. 
 
Best,
R.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 18 2018 at 3:06pm
Absolutely!
I made a custom Rem 700 LR rifle a while back. Custom stock, Shillen "phone pole" 24" BBL Timmey trigger, Tubb alloy firing pin, al the "super-acurate" goodies & so on.
It regularly shot 1/3 MOA with hand-loads @ 300yds. (I went nukkin futs trying to get 1/4 MOA!).
When I had it "just right" I checked the trigger pull, mainly because I was concerned it might be "too light".
It was 3 1/4 Lbs! (But so smooth it felt like about 1 3/4!) it was the classic "like a glass rod breaking".
Smooth is better than light IMO.


Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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