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Shamu View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shamu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 23 2021 at 1:57pm
O.K. you have to be a Goon Show fan to get that one.

Don't shoot till you see the whites of their thighs. (Unofficial motto of the Royal Air Force)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote britrifles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 23 2021 at 3:39pm
Originally posted by AussieShooter AussieShooter wrote:

I researched Appleseed at lunch and really like the program.  IL has a few options but neighboring WI has a bunch of courses scheduled. I will definitely register.  Understand it Mt is the begging of skills development. Duly noted!

Zed, you are a genius. I didn’t think of a 22 enfield.  Back to the sale boards I go...if anyone has a surplus Australian 22 enfield I would be interested....

Be aware that there are rapid fire stages in the Appleseed program with magazine changes.  They teach four positions:  Standing Slow Fire, Sitting Rapid Fire, Prone Rapid Fire and Prone Slow Fire.  A great rifle to learn on is a Ruger 10-22, but any magazine fed .22 can be used.   A semi-auto does make it easier to learn the rapid stages as it gives you more time to concentrate on the fundamentals.  The principles you learn can be applied to any rifle, and certainly a Lee Enfield.

 Your first clinic will be at 25 yards with progressively smaller targets as you work through the 4 stages.  Once you qualify as a Rifleman, you can then take a Known Distance Clinic, these are typically at 100, 200, 300 and 400 yards through the 4 stages.  I also took an Appleseed Unknown Distance Clinic which teaches you how to estimate range and then shoot on targets that are at an unknown distance out to 500 yards. 

I took 5 or 6 Appleseed Clinics, all three I described above.  I qualified Rifleman on my first .22 25 yard clinic, but I learned so much on that first Clinic, I signed up for another 25 yard clinic just to soak up a bit more information and ask questions.  I was fortunate to have exceptionally good instructors.  I then did an Known Distance clinic and worked to get a score of 50/50 which I did with my AR.  I thought after that, I knew how to shoot, but I later realized at that point I was just a novice, there was much much more to learn, and that journey began when I started competing in CMP Matches (with the M1 and Vintage Military Rifle Matches which I used my No. 4).  

After 5 years, I’ve slowly climbed up the latter and now routinely shoot a Gold Medal score in the CMP Games matches and usually place in the top 3, sometimes will win.  I thought, now I know how to shoot.  Then I entered NRA and CMP Hi Power Service Rifle Matches and realized I was wrong again.  Those guys who are at the top of that game are incredibly good shooters.  They include serving members of the Army Marksmanship Units (AMUs) and other military service professional rifle team members, and some are serving Snipers.  So, I’ve been working my way up that latter since last year.  I’m now just able to score a CMP Master classification, but I would like to get to High Master which requires a 98/100 average score in the CMP Service Rifle National Match course (200 Yds Standing Slow Fire, 200 Yards Sitting Rapid Fire, 300 Yards Prone Rapid Fire and 600 Yards Prone Slow Fire).  The last match I shot in I was just 1 point (out of 800) from a High Master score, that is I shot a 783 out of 800.  Each of the four stages has its own challenges, which is what makes it so interesting.  

And if I sought out the next level, what ever that is (Olympic?) I would realize that I’m just a novice shooter. 

This is a journey, and for me, it all started with my first Project Appleseed Clinic about 10 years ago. 



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2021 at 12:29pm
Expect to pay more for an Enfield .22 trainer than for a .303.
But they are continuing to increase in price, so a good investment; plus I think it's impossible to wear out the barrels.
I have 4x  Lee Enfield .22's; they are just so much fun and also generally very accurate. They are mostly single shot; which is s light disadvantage in competition if shooting against the Mas45 for example, that has a magazine.
They are probably more difficult to find in the USA.
It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Goosic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2021 at 2:22pm
AussieShooter. 
I converted a No4Mk1* Long Branch to .22LR.  It is a single shot with a loading platform in the magazine.  It has a Parker Hale PH5C rear target sight with Gehmann optics and a Parker Hale PH1 front globe sight with various inserts that are kept in a brass holder that is inletted  into the buttstock.  It also has a Bisley palm swell and bipod attached.  I might consider parting with it...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2021 at 4:05pm
this reminds me again of both my charnwood and one of my Cno7s i once had that were fitted with the bipods - they shot wee and might have been interesting discussion had i kept them , i did not - trading fodder for thors i really wanted in the collection as im not the shooter some of you are , in hind sight , i might ;like to have them back to retire with -

word to the wise , dont part with things hastily as you may one day regret them being gone , there are many things i now regret but we have to get over them , life choices are always hard but in the end if you make them wisely and at the right time you can reflect on what you did and still smile - im smiling every day , 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Canuck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2021 at 5:39pm
True words, A Square! I used to regret having sold my muscle cars I had, like 8 of them in all. Couldn't keep them and haul them around when moving from house to house with my young family in tow. Sold them, regretted it but then I grew up and got old and found out I did the right thing. I still have some engines I just couldn't part with and those are now worth their weight in gold.
Castles made of sand slip into the sea.....eventually
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